March 9, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 23
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After learning hard lessons in Newark, N.J., the young billionaire is shifting his focus to educational technology, shaking up the world of K-12 philanthropy.
Education Week asked several people from across the political and policy spectrum to weigh in on what a Trump administration might do on education.
A small number of charters try to keep racial and income balance by giving groups of students, such as English-learners, a better chance of admission.
A classroom-based laboratory at Washington State University allows researchers to study what goes on in the brain and the body when students are learning alongside their peers.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The Education Department is proposing regulations that aim to get a better handle on whether certain categories of students are singled out as needing special education at higher rates than other student groups.
Most of the registered test-takers blocked from taking the new SAT on March 5 worked for tutoring companies.
Best of the Blogs
Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, pediatrician Priscilla Chan, are using a diverse mix of entities to support education technology and personalized learning.
In an exclusive interview with Education Week, the Facebook CEO talks about why he is shifting his K-12 giving priorities to personalized learning.
The state pulled the plug on new online tests aligned to the common core, but school leaders in Kingsport, Tenn., see it as a temporary setback in implementing the news standards and assessments.
Acting Education Secretary John B. King Jr. answered a range of policy questions as the Senate education committee weighed his nomination to take the post of secretary.
Oversight hearings on Capitol Hill highlight some divisions between lawmakers on the best way to implement the new education law.
Ill-timed glitches in the administration of online assessments have spurred lawmakers in several states to push bills that would crack down on testing companies.
Lawmakers have approved a sales-tax increase designed to lift average teacher pay to $48,500.
Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard rejected a measure that would have created the first state-level restrictions on transgender students’ use of school restrooms and locker rooms.
ESSA shifts K-12 policy authority to the states, but it's no guarantee that schooling will improve, writes Michael V. McGill.
The diversity crisis in K-12 leadership is hurting students of color, writes Chiefs for Change CEO Michael Magee.
All races should know what black men and women have achieved despite difficult circumstances, writes David C. Banks.
Letters
The 2016 election vindicates Neil Postman's ominous prophecy that we are "amusing ourselves to death," writes T. Robinson Ahlstrom.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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