February 24, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 22
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As more states requiring the ACT or SAT, a gulf is opening between students with disabilities and those without, and it's caught the Justice Department's eye.
To read and understand complex texts, some educators say students will need a deep knowledge of grammar.
An instructional framework called universal design for learning, or UDL, which supports multiple ways to teach lessons, has found a niche in the Every Student Succeeds Act.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
A bill awaiting action from the South Dakota governor would require transgender students to use the restrooms and locker rooms that match with their biological sex at birth.
Connecticut teachers are learning how to talk more meaningfully—and without controversy—about the role of world religions in history and society.
New evidence of a "mode effect" on 2014-15 PARCC exams prompts a fresh look at research on the comparability of computer and paper-based assessments.
A pair of efforts has launched calling for the involvement of multiple local agencies to support the success of poor children in school.
New research offers clues on deaf children's language development and on other cognitive disorders, such as autism, in both hearing and nonhearing children.
Nearly a quarter of newly hired teachers will never vest in the state's troubled Teacher Retirement System, and three quarters won't even make back what they pay into the system, according to a new report.
Best of the Blogs
While New York state recently opted to drop time limits on its tests, Texas is ending a 35-year policy of untimed testing.
Each year, Education Week shines a spotlight on some of the nation’s most outstanding school district leaders in its Leaders To Learn From report. For 2016, we profile 13 of the most influential, inspiring, and innovative district-level leaders in the U.S.
The unexpected vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court comes with several disputes being closely watched by K-12 educators—including one involving union fees—still pending.
As the state testing landscape shifts with the Every Student Succeeds Act, the military could see greater access for its optional aptitude test and career-exploration program.
Legislators in Kansas and Washington struggle over how to pump millions of dollars more into K-12 aid to satisfy impatient state supreme courts.
The major-party hopefuls still in the race as of last week boasted widely varied records and stances on K-12.
Here are summaries of recent annual addresses by governors around the country.
Preschool suspensions promote failure, not success, for vulnerable students, write education professors Denisha Jones and Diane Levin.
We must take care that ed-tech resources do not fracture classrooms into "tech-supported cubicles," writes venture capitalist Jennifer Carolan.
Letters
The city of Cleveland has a successful high-quality preschool program. Eric Gordon and Marcia Egbert explain why it works.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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