January 27, 2016

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Vol. 35, Issue 19
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The academic performance levels of students who take AP courses are still high, according to a pair of analyses from the American Enterprise Institute.
After the violent arrest of an uncooperative South Carolina student, advocates want changes to statutes they say allow students to be arrested for offenses that may not be a crime off school grounds.
In the first few weeks of his tenure, acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. has made it clear he'll keep up the rhetorical drumbeat on educational equity.
Students who never passed the required high school exit exam are getting their diplomas under new laws passed in at least six states.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief

The Education Week Research Center has identified an error in the school finance analysis it conducted for Quality Counts 2016, published as the Jan. 7 issue of Education Week and online.
A new survey of districts and charter groups shows expansion of school-based leader roles, but not enough responsibility to go with them.
New international studies highlight the role of embedded professional-learning programs in school improvement.
Some districts see OneRoster, an interoperability standard developed by an ed-tech consortium, as the most attractive option for helping districts manage the sea of data their teachers and students are using.
If all states decide to go along with the lower cutoff score, an estimated 25,000 more test-takers could be eligible for a GED credential.
Best of the Blogs
A new wave of projects explores why the benefits seen in many academic interventions aren't sustained as students move through school.
The growth in the number of small, personalized, and more affordable "micro schools" is seen as the first innovation in the private school sector in decades.
In this special report, Education Week explores the factors behind the recent teacher shortages in many areas and highlights initiatives designed to improve district hiring processes and tap new pools of prospective educators.
Despite the rise of the testing opt-out movement, states are still on the hook to assure that 95 percent of eligible students take state exams in English/language arts and math.
A legislative panel wants the state to do more frequent audits of local districts, consolidate services, and dictate what efforts should be funded to improve student learning.
Here are summaries of recent annual addresses by governors around the country.
School turnaround plans that replicate unsuccessful state-takeover models are a disservice to students, argue Kent McGuire and three researchers.
A "sobering" study of virtual charters leads to funding reforms, write Marc Sternberg and Marc Holley of the Walton Family Foundation.
As her son outgrows his rigid special education program, Elizabeth Brown writes that it shouldn't be an "all-or-nothing scenario."
Cami Anderson, former K-12 superintendent, writes that charters schools are not a "silver bullet" and suggests a mixed-market alternative.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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