January 13, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 17
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After miscalculating expected revenues, lawmakers in a number of mineral-dependent states are preparing to debate alternative sources of funding for state school aid.
School policy could be further marginalized in the 2016 presidential race now that ESSA resolves big questions over federal power in areas like testing and teacher evaluation.
Amid heightened worries over terrorism and heated political discourse, some students may feel targeted because of their religion or background.
Rural schools are often charged outrageous rates for lousy Internet service. This multimedia reporting project from Education Week investigates whether big changes coming from Washington, including billions of new federal dollars and a menu of market-based reforms recently approved by the FCC, are likely to fix the problem.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The long-time supporter of charter schools will double down on its backing of school choice in more than a dozen cities and states.
The state-run district that takes over low-performing schools has run into partisan trouble fueled by a study showing progress lagging at those schools compared with other turnaround models.
Dozens of new after-school chess clubs have recently launched in the St. Louis region's most challenged schools.
Best of the Blogs
A new service from Education Week includes an online portal to a range of news and analysis about the school market.
This special report outlines the progress schools are making to use digital tools to personalize learning, but also raises the question: Are they reaching far enough?
The new K-12 law contains checks on the U.S. secretary's authority, but the agency still has policy tools in its shed, especially in the areas of civil rights and data resources.
The Institute of Education Sciences has a new chief, new offices, and a new role—but its own reauthorization is still in limbo.
When it comes to the public debate, scholars should own the complexity of their research, says Jeffrey R. Henig.
In participating in public discourse, scholars have a responsibility to the truth above all else, writes Jay P. Greene.
Compelling education research speaks to hearts and political interests, not just intellects, writes AERA President Jeannie Oakes.
Rick Hess explains researchers' responsibilities to the public and shares snapshots of his 2016 Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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