January 6, 2016

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Vol. 35, Issue 15
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This special report on the Every Student Succeeds Act looks at what the law will mean for virtually every aspect of public schooling when it takes full effect in the 2017-18 academic year.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Charter schools in Washington state are fighting to stay open after the state supreme court ruled them unconstitutional, a decision that national advocates worry may lead to ramifications for charters in other states.
Thanks to the impending debut of the revised SAT, many high school juniors are taking as many as three different college-readiness tests this school year.
While many educators hailed the fifth National Education Technology Plan as a compelling statement of what's possible, attempts to make the vision a reality face big hurdles.
K-12 leaders hope new professional guidelines will bolster efforts to redefine the job of overseeing principals.
Best of the Blogs
The Every Student Succeeds Act, the latest version of the nation’s main K-12 law, aims to scale back the hands-on federal role in elementary and secondary education.
With the ink barely dry on the Every Student Succeeds Act, the U.S. Department of Education begins the tricky process of setting the course for implementation.
ESSA, the newly reauthorized version of the ESEA, makes changes in how schools can use money set aside for economically disadvantaged students.
The Every Student Succeeds Act could embolden some states to revise or abandon their current methods for rating teachers.
The new law requires states to measure at least one nonacademic factor, such as student engagement, when tracking schools' performance.
The Every Student Succeeds Act allows states and districts to cobble scores from interim assessments into a single, summative score, but some experts worry that will make the results less valid.
An ESSA provision that lets states use college-entrance exams to measure student achievement could spur a profound shift in high school testing.
The Every Student Succeeds Act takes a more flexible, more nuanced approach to assessing the research evidence for educational programs and policies.
The new federal K-12 law still requires states to identify their worst-performing schools, but states and districts have great leeway in how to turn them around.
The new program is smaller and less prescriptive than Reading First, and it can be applied to students of all ages.
Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states and districts get more leeway—and more options—on funding STEM programs.
Unlike earlier proposals in Congress, the new law includes language that cements states' obligation to support arts education.
The Every Student Succeeds Act locks into law a $250 million grant program to support states as they develop preschool programs and directs money to state early-childhood literacy efforts.
The new law will bring a number of changes to ELL policy that has some advocates and educators worried about the 5 million and growing population of English-learners.
Advocates for students with disabilities say they'll want to be at the table as states hammer out plans to comply with the new federal education law.
Arguments this month will focus on whether to overturn a key precedent allowing unions to charge nonmembers for collective bargaining costs.
State lawmakers around the country will be looking closely at how new flexibility for states under the Every Student Succeeds Act will play out on a key range of issues in their backyards.
Title I aid and state grants for special education are among some of the areas receiving increased aid under the omnibus federal budget deal signed last month.
Eight researchers weigh in on how RTI can be implemented successfully.
Laurene Powell Jobs' investment in model schools is not enough to alter the education landscape, writes Ron Wolk.
Paul Herdman of the Rodel Foundation of Delaware checks in where his state is after RTTT and how the state's education plan can serve as a model for other states responding to ESSA's reduction of federal oversight.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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