December 9, 2015

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Vol. 35, Issue 14
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On accountability, the bill rocketing through Congress departs from key priorities embraced by Education Secretary Arne Duncan in his seven-year tenure, while firming up his influence on early-education and innovation.
The quality of education for tens of thousands of locked-up juveniles significantly lags that of their peers in public schools, advocates say.
A consolidation plan for Fayette County schools pushed by West Virginia's state chief aims to shutter delapidated facilities and open a new one, but has proven divisive.
As big districts like New York and Chicago gear up to teach computer science, the coding lessons are already going full tilt in Avondale, Ariz., schools.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
When students have a positive mindset about math, their brains operate more efficiently, according to researchers from Stanford University.
Decoding Dyslexia, a grassroots coalition founded by parents of children with the learning disability, has a presence in all 50 states and sympathetic ears among state and federal policymakers.
Best of the Blogs
A study suggests that school officials and technology developers often fail to set clear standards for gauging the success of those trial runs and for gathering teacher and student feedback.
The promise of free tuition lured 16,000 students to Tennessee colleges this year; now state officials are working to keep them there.
A dispute involving admissions policies at the University of Texas at Austin is up for arguments before the Supreme Court once again, and K-12 groups are weighing its implications carefully.
The bill approved by a 359-64 margin would scale back the federal role in education for the first time since the early 1980s.
Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states would get significant leeway in a wide range of areas, with the U.S. Department of Education seeing its hands-on role in accountability scaled back considerably. Here are key highlights.
Children have a right to an education free of racist imagery and discrimination, writes attorney Jared Hautamaki.
Woodrow Wilson's administration backed the effort to promote vocational-only education for African-American students, writes Williamson M. Evers.
Many claims about the merits of school reform are "awash in misguided convictions," argues UFT president Michael Mulgrew.
Two researchers suggest evidence-based classroom practices that help teachers promote a positive and secure student learning environment.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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