December 2, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 13
toc cover
Past Issues

For past issues, select from the drop-down menu.

An atypical partnership is tackling one of the most persistent challenges for the charter sector—serving students with disabilities.
A bipartisan deal awaiting action in the House and the Senate would rewrite the law to give states lots of leeway on accountability, school turnarounds, and teacher evaluation, while keeping such “transparency” provisions as annual student testing.
The number of students without adequate Internet connections in school has been cut in half over the past two years, EducationSuperHighway study finds.
High-achieving students from immigrant families face a complex set of considerations in finding the right college.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Obituary
States get the chance to buy only parts of the consortium's common-core-aligned tests, instead of the whole system, and can pick their own vendor.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will invest some $34 million in cooperative initiatives designed to improve teacher-preparation programs' overall effectiveness.
Best of the Blogs
A recruiter for highly selective Gettysburg College scours schools for high-achieving, low-income and minority prospects.
Pennsylvania school systems are feeling the crunch from months of fiscal impasse, even as state lawmakers and the governor redouble their push to finalize a resolution.
A new study focuses on progress under the Obama administration's signature education- redesign program, but touches only lightly on stumbles and controversies.
Only a little more than half of schools that got a third round of School Improvement Grants improved, finds a report issued Nov. 10.
Millions of dollars in public and private financing were unveiled at a daylong summit in Washington on "next-generation high schools."
A pending update of the federal education law stands to shift the bulk of school-turnaround and accountability work to state superintendents.
When teaching African-American history in schools, the work of a historian from a century ago still resonates, writes Jeffrey Aaron Snyder.
A national commitment to adult education could transform the U.S. economy, writes high school teacher Scott Goldstein.
There is a passionate national debate about what many see as “overtesting” in the nation’s schools. Education Week Commentary asked education practitioners and leaders: How significant is this recent shift in dialogue around testing? And where do we go from here?
Letters
Speaking as someone who left the teaching profession, education writer Scott Sterling offers suggestions for keeping educators engaged.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented