October 28, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 10
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An in-depth review of testing in the nation's largest urban school districts concludes assessments are redundant, misaligned with standards, and often don’t address mastery of specific content.
Gifted and honors classes are often wealthy and white, but some districts are tumbling the barriers that keep out low-income students and students of color.
Subtle, everyday biases in the nation's classrooms pose major obstacles to academic success for low-income students and students of color.
A recent controversy in California's Fresno Unified district involving Cyber Dust, founded by billionaire Mark Cuban, highlights the new challenges.
A high-profile lawsuit brought by renowned teacher Rafe Esquith highlights the Los Angeles district's process for investigating teachers accused of misconduct.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
A Geneva-based philanthropy has invested more than $28 million in the past six years to help children, adolescents, and adults with learning impairments that haven't been formally diagnosed.
The National Institutes of Health will dedicate $300 million over the next decade to launch the largest, most comprehensive study to date of how children’s brains develop during adolescence.
Best of the Blogs
Michael V. Walker's job has a singular purpose: keeping the school system's black, male students on a positive academic track.
Newer efforts to bring families of minority students into the classroom are eye-opening for both parents and teachers.
The House and Senate bills to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act take very different tacks on the future of certain federal education programs.
The House of Representatives would let states' Title I aid follow disadvantaged students to the public school of their choice, but doesn't go far enough for some.
State schools chiefs are looking to Montana for help in addressing the academic and community needs of one of the nation’s most disadvantaged populations.
The U.S. Department of Education is encouraged by preliminary state-by-state data showing that graduation rates for the 2013-14 school year were up from the year before.
Military recruiters often fly below the radar at many high schools, and two researchers suggest that's a problem.
The much-revised 2015 AP U.S. history framework drops the moralizing in favor of historical context, writes Jeremy A. Stern.
Alexandra Zapruder, author of the book Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust, discusses how children's accounts of the genocide during WWII serve as a powerful reminder of the dehumanizing effects of racism, bias, and prejudice.
Letters
Testing data should be used as a tool to enhance instruction and learning for teachers and students, writes John Hattie.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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