October 14, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 08
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Teacher effectiveness and common academic standards remain front and center for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, even as the Obama administration, which shares those priorities, prepares to enter its last full year.
Turnover in top leadership in Congress and at the Education Department complicates the prospects for completing unfinished business on education policy.
Dual-credit programs in 19 states feel threatened by a new rule requiring high school teachers of those classes to have a master's degree.
In a state where charters have generated scandal-ridden headlines for years, critics and advocates alike are calling for tougher oversight.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
A new state report says the legislature hasn't done enough to entice teachers to stay, despite some modifications to the salary schedule.
In their indictment of Barbara Byrd-Bennett, federal prosecutors allege the former superintendent steered a $23 million, no-bid contract to her former employers.
Privacy experts are raising the alarm over what they see as overly aggressive data collection in the company's newly unveiled operating system, Windows 10.
Best of the Blogs
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's plan to stay the course on education won praise for steadfastness and renewed some old criticism.
A pair of new laws includes a requirement that students learn about affirmative sexual consent, known as "yes means yes."
The wave of federal documents is likely to continue in the coming months, lawyers who work on special education issues told those attending a conference in Baltimore.
John B. King Jr., who has been filling the duties of deputy federal education secretary, shares policy priorities with those of outgoing Secretary Arne Duncan.
Girls who are victims of sexual abuse are often further traumatized by the juvenile-justice system, writes Gina Womack.
Susan Hopgood, Lily Eskelsen-GarcĂ­a, and Randi Weingarten explain their support for the global "sustainable development goals" adopted recently by the United Nations.
Letters
Restorative practices, rather than zero tolerance, are more effective in solving student discipline problems, write four RAND researchers.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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