October 7, 2015

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Vol. 35, Issue 07
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Duncan, who leaves in December, has pushed through dramatic levels of change in K-12 policy over nearly seven years in office.
Two studies find that achievement gaps within schools account for more of the overall academic disparities among students of different races or economic backgrounds than do gaps between schools.
Crucial for assuring that school inclusion takes place for students with disabilities, these workers have long been left out of the loop on professional development.
A proposal from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation to more than double the number of charters in the city is raising major questions about its viability.
Shifting demographics and economic interests are transforming views on multilingual education around the country.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
The American Express Foundation is investing nearly $2.5 million in a diverse array of programs that aim to develop and support school leaders.
The largest of the common-core adoption states is poised to approve 25 of the 29 materials submitted by publishers.
Best of the Blogs
By the end of 2nd grade and into 3rd, children who enrolled in Tennessee's publicly funded program were lagging behind their peers who didn't attend preschool.
Some in the "maker" movement are looking to start a 1-to-1 trend in schools akin to the push to put a digital device in the hands of every student.
The beleaguered digital education division that News Corp. invested $1 billion in since 2010 was sold on Sept. 30 to a team of 11 Amplify executives.
This special report on professional development explores the juncture between the common core and growing efforts to reconfigure learning opportunities for teachers.
The U.S. Department of Education has relaunched one of the most powerful tools it wields over states' academic standards and assessments: the "peer review" process that had been suspended for three years.
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan would like to see states and local governments repurpose some of the money they spend on incarceration and pour it into salaries for educators.
The policy frenzy to establish new methods for evaluating teachers over the past few years has led to an unintended byproduct: lots of litigation.
In San Francisco, two simple communication strategies are narrowing the achievement gap, write Richard Carranza, Susanna Loeb, and Benjamin York.
Common-core test outcomes should serve as indicators for assessing student needs, argue Joshua Starr and Elaine Weiss.
Teachers should embrace the idea of students choosing their own books, even if they are too hard, Barbara C. Wheatley says.
Letters
Parents and students must join forces to contribute to the civic development of young people, writes Michael McDevitt.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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