September 30, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 06
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As large-scale choice programs mature and new ones are created, advocates are looking to the thriving charter sector for lessons in how to grow.
From the courtroom and ballot box to legislative chambers, budget battles heat up in a number of states as the 2015-16 school year gets underway.
Amid some growing pains for its new full-day prekindergarten program, the city has ramped up outreach efforts and more than tripled the number of sets from two years ago.
Schools are revamping traditional back-to-school nights to enlist parents' help in ensuring that their children master key academic skills.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The Walton Family Foundation is backing research on how to better measure noncognitive skills.
While the updated College Scorecard offers more indicators for consumers, like college graduation rates and debt loads, it may fall on high school counselors to interpret the data for students.
Two early learning experts outline how they want to see devices, apps, and software treated as tools to foster better reading interactions between children and adults.
Best of the Blogs

Teacher professional development today stands at the juncture of two developments: The adoption of the Common Core State Standards, and growing efforts to reconfigure and personalize learning opportunities for teachers. This special report explores that intersection, providing profiles of new ideas and challenges in PD today.
As Congress worked to avert a budget-driven shutdown of federal agencies, aid recipients weighed the potential impacts, which could vary widely.
Cases before the U.S. Supreme Court this term may reach into teachers' paychecks, union treasuries, and college admissions offices.
Principals can help counteract the negative outcomes predicted for students who live in certain neighborhoods, writes principal coach Rebecca Wheat.
We don’t hear enough about interventions proven to make a difference for America’s most disadvantaged youths, writes Jim Shelton.
In boosting higher-educational attainment, we mustn’t sacrifice quality, writes New England College of Business president Howard E. Horton.
We should promote the intrinsic value of education ideas, rather than justifications tied to external outcomes, advises Alfie Kohn.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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