September 9, 2015

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Vol. 35, Issue 03
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The conflict between some teachers and the management of Alliance College-Ready Public Schools highlights tensions as charter schools mature.
The city's new superintendent, Christopher Cerf, is pledging to work with the community as it moves toward regaining governance of public schools after 20 years under state authority.
By building on its Navajo students' culture, the STAR School is giving some graduates the confidence to seek a college education far from home.
The state's decision to close its preschool pilot program to 4-year-olds who are not legal U.S. residents has raised sticky questions about access.
Despite skepticism from some parts of the mathematics field, new strategies are emerging for teachers to help students develop positive learning attitudes toward math.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Obituary
Report Roundup
Average scores either dipped or stayed the same for this year’s crop of high school graduates, according to college-testing officials.
The biggest increases from last year to this year were seen in physics and computer science, according to new data from the College Board.
Districts have shifted away from screening students for lice, and experts favor policies that keep those infected in class, even as some strains of the insect are resistant to traditional treatments.
Best of the Blogs
The creation of an online platform by ed-tech company Knewton marks the most aggressive attempt yet to mix adaptive tools with open content.
The writings of Aristotle and Euclid become the texts in new National Science Foundation-funded project to pilot the use of primary math materials.
Concerns that too many qualified students are missing out on financial assistance have prompted calls to make the FAFSA process easier and more accessible.
Did any states see major improvements in K-12 education during the terms of the nine governors and former governors now running for president?
It can be tough to draw a clear line between the K-12 policies a governor pushed while in office and improvements in student achievement, researchers say.
Dueling bills passed in both chambers to overhaul the federal education law face lawmakers fresh off a five-week summer sabbatical.
School districts are expected to rewrite policies to limit the use of suspensions and expulsions under a statute championed by student groups.
The Minnesota Republican's forthcoming departure puts added pressure on lawmakers to come to an agreement on their respective ESEA overhauls by the end of the year.
The faceoff between the legislature and governor has caused some school systems to turn to loans and reserves in the absence of state money.
The education field has too many unquestioned assumptions that persist even as the world changes, writes Angela Minnici.
Letters
Despite gains since the first edition of One Teacher in Ten, many gay and lesbian educators lack policy protections and the support of school leaders, says Kevin Jennings.
Letters
In an excerpt from her book The Prize, Dale Russakoff details the backstory of how two public figures attracted an infusion of private money in a bid to transform Newark's flagging schools.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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