July 8, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 36
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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case challenging unions' practice of compelling nonmembers to pay service fees.
Now that state lawmakers have approved a split-up of the Clark County school district, which includes Las Vegas, the question is how to go about doing it.
There's no consistent strategy as states cast a critical eye on the amount of time students spend taking standardized tests and the types of assessments that are required.
Even teachers in states that never adopted the standards are downloading common-core-aligned curricula for their classrooms.
Early-education advocates welcome the idea of a longer day and year for Head Start operations, but wonder if there will be federal funding to match.
News in Brief
Obituary
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A federal appeals court has sided with the state, but civil rights officials are still pushing Arizona to change its services for English-learners.
A planned teacher education academy spearheaded by former Teachers College Dean Arthur E. Levine has aims to experiment with some of the most high-profile—and controversial—ideas in higher education delivery.
Spellers from across the country will compete for the championship title later this month at the fifth annual National Spanish Spelling Bee in Albuquerque, N.M.
Best of the Blogs
Leadership, professional development, and hands-on learning were on the minds of nearly 20,000 educational technology enthusiasts who attended the ISTE annual conference in Philadelphia.
Some plans submitted to the federal government pitch new ideas for how to best share the most-qualified teachers, while others repackage strategies already underway.
With most legislative sessions complete, the scorecard shows that many states are focused on rebuilding K-12 funding and grappling with the thorny issue of student assessments.
Even when the U.S. Supreme Court is not weighing education-specific cases, many of its decisions reach into the schools—and the 2014-15 term was no exception.
Many state legislatures notched incremental steps in expanding the scope and budgets for publicly funded early-care and -education programs.
The bipartisan proposal to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act may take up a week or more of the Senate's time.
Despite a veto threat from the president, Republicans in both chambers of Congress are pushing measures that would cut billions of dollars from the department and eliminate a slew of programs.
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Louisiana Gov. Bobbie Jindal, and real estate developer Donald Trump are now in the running, each with their own views on education issues.
Schools in Rochester, N.Y., demonstrate winning strategies for extending learning time, write the superintendent and a city leader.
Efforts to close the achievement gap ignore many advantages of privilege, writes former Massachusetts secretary of education Paul Reville.
Letters
The recent police violence in McKinney, Texas, and elsewhere should be a clarion call to colleges of education to confront patterns of racial injustice, writes Nicole Nguyen.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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