May 20, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 31
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Amid racially charged incidents in U.S. cities, some advocacy and law-enforcement groups are taking steps to foster better relations between police and minority youths.
A combination of factors keeps academically talented low-income students from getting the advanced instruction they need to reach their full potential.
A move in Congress to promote schools' use of free learning resources could have a major impact on the development of curricula.
Some 42,000 highly trained raters will score 109 million test responses in English/language arts and math in the biggest and most controversial student-assessment project in history.
Outreach and broader awareness of the U.S. Education Department's willingness to tackle complaints may help account for a surge in cases to the department's office for civil rights.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Two pioneering researchers in the field raised concerns about unreliable results from methods used to grade students’ noncognitive skills.
New analyses of a 1990s anti-poverty initiative find positive long-term outcomes from children's moves to higher-income areas.
Best of the Blogs
At the Paterson Academy for the Gifted and Talented, teachers say students’ diverse backgrounds deepen learning for everyone.
Leaders of elite public high schools are banding together to find ways to enroll more students from low-income families and underrepresented minority groups.
The debate over how to best protect student data has legislators weighing the views of privacy advocates and education technology providers in this year’s crop of proposals.
State legislators and the governor are under pressure to craft a new plan after the state’s high court overturned a 2013 statute altering pensions for retired teachers.
There is irony in today's U.S. education standards resembling those of pre-World War II Japan, writes Lawrence Baines.
Sir Ken Robinson shares his thoughts on student engagement and testing, the future of teacher education programs, and why vocational education matters.
Letters
Microsoft's chief technology officer, Cameron Evans, writes that schools need a cultural shift in order to protect student data.
The path to securing acceptable school privacy practices is not a simple one, write Jules Polonetsky and Joseph Jerome.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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