May 13, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 30
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A special session over how to pay for basic education bares partisan divides over tax policy and questions about the fallout for districts and unions.
As most states shift their required tests to computers, teachers are discovering that their students are missing key technical skills to show what they know.
A collective of teachers, advocates, and scholars is leveraging social media to elevate the perspectives of people of color in education policy discussions.
As state policymakers push for more oversight of home schooling families, advocates for education at home are split over how much regulation is necessary.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A group of 10 educators claims the state erects arbitrary barriers to make it difficult for out-of-state teachers to obtain certification in the state.
After some 5,000 schools were destroyed, rebuilding may take years in devastated areas, experts caution, while those that remain operational offer an anchor for children and their families.
A years-long effort to revise professional standards for principals, assistant principals, and other administrators has recently led to a dispute over which key aspects of the job should be emphasized.
Best of the Blogs
Librarians are showing growing interest in the "maker movement" as their roles shift from collectors of information to facilitators of project-based learning.
The president's "My Brother’s Keeper" program will continue his work addressing barriers for boys and young men of color.
Early-grades reading instruction has long been a central point of emphasis—and concern—for educators and policymakers. That's in large part owing to a provocative body of research showing that students who don't read with proficiency by the end of 3rd grade are far more likely to experience poor academic outcomes, including leaving school without a diploma. This Education Week special report takes a wide-ranging look at new efforts to address the challenges of early-grades reading instruction.
The two national teachers' unions put muscle behind passage of the Affordable Care Act, but now support legislation to repeal a tax that stands to affect their members.
The heads of the Education and Labor Departments discussed ways the federal government could support the Baltimore community in the aftermath of last month's rioting.
Three new Republican candidates have tossed their hats into the ring for the 2016 presidential contest: Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina, and Mike Huckabee.
As library resources dwindle, philanthropists and policymakers could give e-book sharing a big boost, write David H. Rothman and Jim Duncan.
The ESEA language policy does not reflect the critical role a student's first language plays in cognitive development, writes Joe Levitan.
Schools need to meet the social, emotional, and educational needs of their gifted students, argues Celi Trépanier.
Political gamesmanship has triggered collective amnesia of what our public schools looked like when the ESEA was first signed into law, Sherrilyn Ifill says.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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