May 6, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 29
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Activists urging parents to opt their children out of tests aligned to the Common Core State Standards hope to build on momentum in states like New York.
The testing provider accused of botching the state's common-core assessments last month claims the responsibility lies at least partly with another vendor.
The schools in Lawrence have made steady progress in raising student achievement and graduation rates since state education officials stepped in to turn around the struggling district.
While statewide adoptions of the Next Generation Science Standards are going slowly, some districts are moving fast to bring the new standards to classrooms.
While some schools have struggled to meet the needs of an influx of immigrant students, others are offering supports to help them get a linguistic, cultural, and academic foothold.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
AASA, the School Superintendents Association, moves to end its partnership with the SUPES Academy, which has become embroiled in an FBI investigation into its $20.5 million no-bid contract with the Chicago public schools.
With a five-year, $10 million federal grant, cognitive scientists are studying ways to remake a popular middle school math series to enhance students' learning.
The volume of high-school-equivalency testing dropped by half in 2014 after the General Educational Development exam was revised to align with the common-core standards.
The city's youths call for schools to focus on underlying economic, racial, and social issues that too often lead to deaths of young black men.
They are examining how emerging technologies facilitate new types of hands-on learning, and how technology can provide a window into students’ thinking.
Best of the Blogs
A campaign in Lawrence, Mass., to convince students not to give up on diplomas includes intensive supports and customized pathways to graduation.
As the U.S. Supreme Court weighs whether to legalize gay marriage nationally, recent research estimates some 210,000 children under 18 are being raised by same-sex couples.
Attempting to alter a federal education funding formula is politically problematic because a change can shift money from one state or district to another.
Some are pleased with elements of the measure approved by the Senate education committee to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, though concerns remain.
The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments over whether states must license or recognize same-sex marriages, a case with potential ramifications for parental rights in a school context.
An academic reward turned into a painful experience earlier this year for a group of American Indian students, Robert Cook writes.
It’s easy for the K-12 profession to get caught up in jargon that sounds important but says little, writes Levi Folly.
To prepare preschool teachers for the classroom, we need to look beyond conventional teacher education, argues Katharine B. Stevens.
We must break the financial barrier that prevents poor children from participating in early-education programs, writes Nicholas Burnett.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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