April 22, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 28
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The state's recent decision to award a tentative, $240 million contract to the Educational Testing Service drew an angry response from its rival.
Foes of the Common Core State Standards hoped this would be their year in state legislatures, but so far they have little to boast about.
A seminal study on the early word gap between the children of high school dropouts and those of college graduates has led to more nuanced findings about language development.
Three national charter networks have recently scaled back plans to take over failing schools in the district, underscoring the challenges for turnaround efforts.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Most of the former educators convicted in a cheating scandal will remain free on bond while they appeal.
Nearly 200 colleges and universities agreed to use Smarter Balanced assessment results in deciding which students take remedial courses.
The Clark County, Nev., and Denver districts are testing a new approach to school leadership, giving successful administrators more than one school to manage.
Veteran USA Today reporter Greg Toppo discusses his new book examining the hopes and reality of how schools and students are trying to use digital games for learning.
Two House education committee members demand to know why New York City’s Head Start grant was not suspended or revoked after inspections raised concerns about child safety.
Best of the Blogs
The compromise bill approved by the Senate education committee to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act faces other priorities awaiting debate, and is likely to draw intense partisan sparring.
A trio of Republican presidential hopefuls—Sens. Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and Marco Rubio—aren’t necessarily in lockstep with congressional education leaders on key issues.
Gay couples are making their case to the U.S. Supreme Court over states' refusal to license or recognize such unions, a conflict with an array of implications for schools.
State of the States
Educators should dissuade students from entering colleges with low graduation rates, write Joseph Sanacore and Anthony T. Palumbo.
High school freshman Katie Benmar writes that teachers who enhance learning with technology hold students' attention.
Memorizing the answers to a naturalization test will not help students learn about civics, writes Joseph Kahne.
Letters
School vouchers divert millions from public education and do not produce results for students, writes Delaware Gov. Jack Markell.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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