April 15, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 27
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The conviction of 11 former educators on state racketeering charges that could land them behind bars has ignited debate about whether the punishment fits the crime.
Recent controversies over statutes aimed at protecting religious beliefs offer a reminder of challenges school administrators face in dealing with the sensitive issue of religious accommodation.
With research showing benefits of playtime, more schools limit or ban the use of taking away recess to discipline misbehaving students.
While many educators find benefits to using tech-based instructional materials, they find a mix of digital and print works best for their students.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
News in Brief
A last-minute budget deal in New York will have major implications for how the state’s teachers are trained, evaluated, and granted tenure.
A school district delegation from Anaheim, Calif., traveled to Nashville, Tenn., this spring to learn what it takes to create a robust music education program.
A congressional proposal to roll federal after-school funds into a broader block grant has created an opening for critics and a rallying cry for advocates.
Best of the Blogs
In simple terms, blended learning is a strategy to combine technology-based instruction with traditional, teacher-to-student lessons. And it exists everywhere in school districts these days. This special report examines how K-12 systems are overcoming the challenges related to this approach.
Testing, teacher evaluations, and A-F grading systems are among the issues as states apply for renewal of flexibility under the No Child Left Behind Act.
The proposal hammered out after weeks of negotiation includes policies meant to charm members of both parties as they rewrite the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
The pressure is on as educators—especially those new to the classroom—toggle between leftover requirements from Tennessee's retired standards and those imposed by the common core.
Next spring's round of assessments will be aligned to the Common Core State Standards, but the test-developer's tight time frame poses challenges.
Several professional challenges work against teachers, including the lack of autonomy and the absence of downtime, writes Jack Schneider.
Jean-Claude Brizard writes that the ESEA's goal of equalizing K-12 funding in states and districts is key to serving low-income students.
Letters
Letters
Higher ed. should be prepared for the common-core learning experiences of college-bound students, write Harold G. Levine and Michael W. Kirst.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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