April 1, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 26
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Half a century after passage of the nation's main K-12 education law, calibrating the proper federal role in education remains an elusive goal and a subject of heated debate.
When a school superintendent leaves the position, or is fired, it can complicate a district's relationship with private funders that make heavy investments in a variety of school improvement efforts.
A New Jersey high school student who posted a tweet about a question on a common-core test has unintentionally sparked a national controversy.
A growing number of programs around the country are allowing students with disabilities to take virtual courses created with their needs in mind.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Policy questions emerge as evidence continues to mount that teachers who earn national-board certification see higher test scores among their students.
Best of the Blogs
Nancie Atwell, winner of the Global Teacher Award, had some surprising advice for young people interested in becoming public school teachers today: Don’t do it.
A program that enlists middle-of-the-pack students to tutor their struggling peers seems to boost the test scores for both groups.
School choice, a state-run district, teacher evaluations, and K-12 funding are among the issues facing legislators now in the midst of their biennial session.
A flurry of parents seeking to opt their children out of new common-core-aligned assessments has some states asking federal officials to clarify test-participation mandates.
With the clock ticking on the Obama administration’s time in office, the education secretary discusses NCLB waivers, testing, Race to the Top, and other issues.
Those seeking to quantify the effect of Title I aid on the achievement of poor children face a number of hurdles stemming from the nature of the program itself.
Key studies over the past several decades have sought to draw meaningful conclusions about the federal funding stream aimed at the education of disadvantaged students.
Throughout U.S. schools, black males are disciplined more than any other group, writes education professor Tyrone Howard.
The policy implications of the ESEA, and its most recent reauthorization, the No Child Left Behind Act, have been at the heart of an enduring public debate.
Learning takes time, so rushing children to finish assignments is not the answer, writes speech-language pathologist Rebecca Givens Rolland.
Reading and math should be held to the same standard: bringing meaning to the printed symbols, writes Marilyn Burns.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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