March 25, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 25
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Arizona and North Dakota require high school students to correctly answer portions of the test to graduate, and other states are weighing such a mandate.
The crisply produced education quarterly straddles the worlds of newsstand magazines and academic journals—and sometimes sparks controversy along the way.
The approaches diverge from those taken by most of their public school counterparts, but experts suggest the tactics and strategies could be replicated.
New CTE programs pose a new challenge for educators: how to form deeper, longer partnerships with businesses.
New research challenges the belief that teachers plateau early in their careers, suggesting instead their effectiveness grows over the first decade in the classroom and beyond.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Roughly half of the state's 1.1 million schoolchildren are eligible for vouchers, including students who have never attended public schools.
Enacting policies that support and encourage district and school-level student-engagement efforts should be a priority, says the National Association of State Boards of Education.
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has pledged continued support for the Department of Education’s Teach to Lead initiative.
Best of the Blogs
Third-party entities are showing educators and businesses how to work together to shape new, more relevant career and technical education programs.
The spending plan would place increased weight on standardized test scores in teachers' evaluations and make it harder for teachers to earn tenure.
A task force report two years in the making recommends significant changes to the state's education system to improve achievement for students with disabilities.
Lawmakers approve a plan that would ditch the state’s current education formula, but its fate is entangled with a long-running legal dispute over the funding.
While the standards offer depth, they are not well supported by school instructional policies, writes teacher John Troutman McCrann.
Sometimes the common core seems like a blank projection screen for what people want to see, says teacher Peter Greene.
Following his district's big academic gains, receiver/superintendent Jeffrey Riley explains why he won't yet implement the standards assessment.
Charlotte Danielson explains what a study uncovered about the kind of support educators need to implement the standards.
The common standards have had positive and negative results for teacher Ariel Sacks, who says that the key to realizing their potential is teacher input.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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