March 4, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 23
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Researchers found that while social media gave parents a bigger voice in the debate, it also led to a "proxy war" over common standards.
An award-winning, publicly funded digital learning game that asks middle school students to assume the role of a black slave in 1800s America is prompting debate about when and how to employ the power of interactive technology to teach about painful eras of history.
A rise in the use of the chest-mounted video-recording devices in schools is prompting districts to weigh both accountability and privacy issues.
Decades of policy work could offer rivals plenty to critique should the former first lady, senator, and secretary of state make a run for the White House in 2016.
Amid new efforts to improve outcomes for black and Latino boys, some civil rights advocates ask if districts are violating federal protections meant to ensure educational quality for girls.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Policymakers in at least four states are pushing back on the revised framework, saying it emphasizes negative aspects of the nation's history and downplays "American exceptionalism."
To win a second term, Mayor Rahm Emanuel faces a rival who is strongly backed by the city's influential teachers' union.
Best of the Blogs
The average combined math and verbal SAT scores of new teachers in New York state schools rose over the last decade, a new study finds.
Minorities and students with disabilities are disciplined at a disproportionate rate, researchers say, and there are wide variations among states and districts.
New Republican governors in Illinois, Maryland, and Massachusetts are looking to push K-12 initiatives and make budget choices affecting schools in states where Democrats control the legislatures.
Two days of floor debate on the House Republican measure to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act revealed sharp differences over K-12 policy.
State of the States
Students would benefit from a well-defined, but limited governmental role in schools, write Paul T. Hill and Ashley Jochim.
Educational technology is booming, but its innovators have largely ignored the science behind how children learn, writes Matthew Muench.
Dysfunctional school boards make it difficult for school districts to hold on to good superintendents, argues John Mannes.
Letters
School administrators, not teacher-tenure laws, are responsible for "ineffective" educators, writes former teacher and principal David Finley.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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