February 25, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 22
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Education savings accounts—which allow parents to use public funds to customize schooling for their children—are the newest frontier in school choice.
Researchers are finding that having a parent in prison can be more traumatic to students than a parent's death or divorce, and can create problems for children's education and health.
Even some of the most ardent supporters of the standards say the ones developed for the upper grades have weaknesses and should be revisited.
The case before the high court asks whether teachers' duty to report suspected child abuse makes them adjuncts of law enforcement when it comes to prosecution.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A combination of earlier testing times and interruptions in instruction due to snow days is putting pressure on teachers to cover as much content as they can to get students ready.
The latest signs from the U.S. Department of Education point to another year of record-breaking graduation rates, but experts differ on the reasons why.
The National Academy of Advanced Teacher Education is built on the idea that the best teachers need opportunities to wrestle with cognitively challenging professional work to improve their craft and spread their expertise.
The "experimental" schools initially housed at universities were envisioned as centers of instructional innovation and teacher training. Many are now private schools.
More than 40 ed-tech companies gathered in Washington for the first of several expected training sessions to help companies understand their legal obligations for protecting students' data privacy.
Best of the Blogs

Each year, Education Week shines a spotlight on some of the nation’s most outstanding school district leaders in its Leaders To Learn From report. For 2015, we profile 16 leaders who are tackling some of the most pressing challenges in K-12 education.
School Improvement Grant rules out this month give more leeway on turnaround strategies to states with waivers, not just to SIG recipients.
Officials scramble to cut back the length of time needed for the Indiana's state assessment, amid a continued tussle over education leadership in the state.
The National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers step up lobbying efforts, targeting lawmakers in their districts.
State of the States
The U.S. Supreme Court to hear the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, involving subsidies to those in states without their own health-care insurance marketplaces.
UCLA basketball coach John Wooden understood that a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching students does not work, writes David Perrin.
The portrayal of a retooled Annie as poor, black, and illiterate is a realistic portrayal, writes Lydia Carlis. ​
Listening to educators and allowing research to guide decisionmaking will lead to real change in U.S. schools, writes Jack Jennings.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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