February 18, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 21
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An outbreak of the disease is causing policymakers and public-health officials to revisit why families are allowed to opt out of vaccines required for school attendance.
The Jefferson Education Accelerator, an effort designed with help from the University of Virginia, asks companies to subject their products to independent research conducted in schools.
When it comes to choosing print and online resources for schools, states are increasingly putting more of the authority in the hands of districts.
People looking to curb the behavioral-modification practices, including advocates for those with disabilities, are finding fertile ground among state lawmakers.
State lawmakers and school district officials are again wrestling with questions about schools' authority to access and monitor students' social-media accounts.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Even the wealthiest and best-educated young Americans lag behind peers in other countries in literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving.
The $1 million award from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation brought districts scholarship money, technical assistance, and recognition, but did not fuel sufficient improvement in student achievement.
Best of the Blogs
The proposal, if approved Feb. 26, would for the first time regulate broadband firms that provide high-speed Internet service as though they were public utilities.
The formal push by four school districts to boost state funding for new standardized tests could muddy rollout of California’s common-core assessments.
The president wants a 7 percent hike in funding for the U.S. Department of Education, but a GOP-controlled Congress has pledged to keep a tight rein on spending.
Title I and the federal role in K-12 are among the top issues as a revision of the No Child Left Behind Act passes the House education committee.
Legislation in Congress to rewrite the law would undo key elements of the waivers in areas such as standards, school turnarounds, and teacher evaluation.
State of the States
How schools treat young journalists matters because the future of journalism is precarious, writes Frank LoMonte of the Student Press Law Center.
The reauthorization of the ESEA must require annual testing so states can help struggling school districts, argues Karen Hawley Miles.
Garden-based learning supports many different learning styles, says Jane Hirschi, who urges teachers to lead the movement.
Letters
Under fire from officials in her Pennsylvania school district, student newspaper editor Gillian McGoldrick defends her stance against publishing the name of an offensive mascot.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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