February 4, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 20
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In an era of "competency-based education," the Carnegie unit remains a "guarantee" that all students are getting a minimum level of learning time, says a new report.
A new study says U.S. teachers still lead the world in time spent in front of a class—but not as much as everyone thinks.
As public K-12 options multiply in some cities, families are paying for experts to guide them through the selection and enrollment processes.
Condoleezza Rice's ascension to the top spot at the Foundation for Excellence in Education is among several recent transitions at influential advocacy organizations sharing similar priorities.
A controversial federal proposal to improve monitoring of teacher-preparation programs has drawn more than 2,300 public comments, many of them reflecting coordinated opposition from higher education and policy groups.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
An expanded edition of Doug Lemov's popular book is published as interest in practice-based teacher preparation is growing.
The pairing of blended learning and an expanded school day hits the sweet spot for improving K-12 education, concludes a new guide for educators and policymakers.
Best of the Blogs
Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill agree that teacher evaluations are crucial, but as they take up the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, they are shying away from such a requirement.
A program that pays for nurses and trained workers to make home visits, intended to change the health and educational trajectories of some of the most vulnerable families, will sunset in March unless Congress acts.
Libia Gil, the head of the U.S. Department of Education's office of English-language acquisition, says she is working to decrease the time English-learners spend testing and preparing for tests.
Voucher opponents worry about a provision in a draft bill to revise the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that would let aid for poor children follow them to their public schools of choice.
State of the States
The common core offers the promise of equal educational opportunity for poor and minority children, writes Wade Henderson.
Public schools could help disengaged youths by replicating a successful military program that has bolstered student achievement, writes Hugh B. Price.
Until all students have easy access to the Internet, online courses could impede rather than improve achievement among lower-income youths, Norman Eng says.
Southeast Asian students are a sometimes-forgotten group with specific language and learning needs, say Quyen Dinh and Brenda Shum.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the MetLife Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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