January 28, 2015

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Vol. 34, Issue 19
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More than a dozen education school deans are banding together, aiming to design a coherent curricula for teacher-preparation programs.
With the shift to a majority-poor enrollment in the nation's public schools, policymakers and school officials need to up the ante in addressing the needs of disadvantaged children and the challenges in educating them, researchers and educators say.
At a recent national conference in Florida, advocates and parents strategized on getting more people involved in the growing practice of "test refusal."
The Guilford County, N.C., school district and its vendor, Amplify, have shared the cost of getting a failed 1-to-1 computing initiative back on track this school year.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A new study also finds that nearly one-third of students who didn't choose one of the district's "welcoming schools" opted for lower-performing schools than the ones they left behind.
Advocates predict this month's endorsement from the Boston teachers' union will spur more districts to extend the school day.
When it comes to comparing school systems, test scores are just the tip of the iceberg, researchers argue.
Best of the Blogs
The rate of departures among state schools chiefs now rivals that of urban superintendents, and some states are turning to district administrators to fill the void at the top.
Several witnesses implored Sen. Alexander to maintain annual testing in the ESEA, but he continues to entertain alternatives.
The president calls for two free years of community college and child-care aid, but ESEA goes unmentioned.
State of the States
To fix how this country evaluates education schools will require more than just data measurement, writes Susan H. Fuhrman.
In some struggling majority-minority schools, the emphasis is on discipline to the detriment of learning, Samina Hadi-Tabassum says.
Rather than quick fixes through "management science," schools must improve students’ attitudes about achievement, Garrison Walters says.
Letters
One of the leading proponents of differentiated instruction, Carol Ann Tomlinson, writes a spirited defense of the teaching practice.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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