January 21, 2015

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 18
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W.Va. is the second state to have a debate surface over climate-change language in the Next Generation Science Standards for K-12 schools.
As Congress kicks off new efforts to rewrite the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the No Child Left Behind mandates on state assessments are at the heart of the debate.
A coalition of education organizations has developed resources that aim to help educators properly support students dealing with death and loss.
Pediatricians join the Too Small to Fail campaign's push to encourage parents to talk, read, and sing to their infants and toddlers as a key precursor to literacy.
High-choice cities such as New Orleans and Denver have tried to simplify the school-selection process for families, but challenges remain.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
AASA, the School Superintendents Association, is training a new generation of administrators to deftly manage the complex demands of running the nation's school systems.
There's no end in sight to the Institute of Education Sciences' long wait to fill top leadership vacancies and get a reauthorization.
State officials are scrambling to make sure their broadband network provides service to school districts, following a legal battle that has left the network's future in limbo.
A proposed new federal Student Digital Privacy Act would put new restrictions on how companies use student data, but hurdles abound.
Best of the Blogs
In this special report, we examine how educators and policymakers are cultivating principals who can be the kind of political, managerial, and instructional leaders the profession now demands.
Worries over federal compliance slow implementation of a new law giving school-based teams the power to develop course-completion and graduation standards for some special education students.
The big questions are how to pay for the $60 billion initiative proposed by President Barack Obama and whether the Republican-controlled Congress will approve it.
State of the States
Good laws are important, but they aren't the only key to successful charter schools, Nina Rees and Todd Ziebarth say.
Making the connections clear between academics and work will benefit many students, says Jonathan Hasak.
Letters
Letters
Improving school-community collaboration is one way to help students get the mental-health treatment they need, S. Brock and H.T. Brant say.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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