December 10, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 14
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Ensuring that charter schools don't turn away students with special needs and English-learners is the goal of secret-caller programs in the District of Columbia and Massachusetts.
Lawmakers and governors—new and re-elected—are likely to turn their attention to standards, testing, funding, and school choice when the curtain rises on the 2015 legislative season.
The sale of ConnectEDU Inc. this year played out on a public stage, and raised concerns among school leaders and privacy experts about how its considerable trove of student data would be used.
A partnership between a Tacoma, Wash., elementary school and the local housing authority shows promise for driving down high rates of student mobility.
When it comes to setting the bar on who gets credit for college-level work done in high school, postsecondary institutions are all over the map.
News in Brief
Obituary
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Best of the Blogs
One multistate testing consortium—the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers—is giving tests this fall to 30,000 secondary students.
John I. Goodlad, who died last month, is best known for writing A Place Called School, based on a landmark study of 1,000 classrooms.
David Hodge, the president of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, discusses practices at his school for recognizing college-level work completed in high school.
Districts and schools are still adjusting to the new formula, which gives them more money but pushes communities hard on student performance and how that aid is used.
Policy debates over immigration and tax extensions draw more attention as the lame-duck 113th Congress works to tie up fiscal loose ends to keep government agencies running.
Over the past three years, the state has invested heavily in common-core training for teachers, but has recently signaled a weaker commitment to the standards amid rising opposition.
The U.S. Department of Education is retooling the way it provides technical assistance to states on complex issues involving students with disabilities.
Critics like United Students Against Sweatshops should applaud Teach For America, not bash it, former Milwaukee schools chief Howard Fuller writes.
The benefits of bilingual K-12 schooling drive Annalisa Nash Fernandez to go to great lengths for her children.
To be effective, systems should focus on birth through high school, say Elliot Regenstein and Rio Romero-Jurado.
Letters
Problem-solving, not technology, should be the centerpiece of blended learning planning, say Michael Horn and Heather Staker.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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