December 3, 2014

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Vol. 34, Issue 13
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More than half the students who take the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium test are expected to fall below the cutoffs for grade-level proficiency in English/language arts and mathematics.
Teacher colleges would need to provide proof of their graduates' classroom skills in helping advance student learning, under proposed rules issued by the U.S. Department of Education.
Drawing on real-world advice from principals, several initiatives in the Obama administration's second term aim to address the needs of school leaders.
Through parent math nights, letters home, and videos, schools are providing a quieter counterpoint to media critiques of the math standards.
As a condition of doing business, the districts are demanding a universal technical format they believe can help educators manage digital content and personalize instruction.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
A battery of new licensing tests in New York has led to relatively low passing rates for prospective teachers, according to data issued this week by the state education department.
The nearly 4 million K-12 students who have at least one undocumented parent stand to benefit from the president’s executive action.
New research suggests that the Tools of the Mind program produces bigger effects for kindergartners than it does for younger children.
Best of the Blogs
New research suggests that word problems might be easier to grasp and more beneficial at the beginning, rather than the end, of a math lesson.
Many districts use needs assessments and pilot tests to set ed-tech priorities, but those efforts tend to produce little useful information for companies, the report says.
Kevin Huffman gained prominence for policy positions as Tennessee's education commissioner, but he also clashed with state lawmakers and local superintendents.
Those seeking continued leeway from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act will largely be able to stay the course in key policy areas, federal guidance says.
New guidance offers leeway as states craft ways to ensure disadvantaged students have access to as many highly qualified teachers as other students.
Interweaving arts and sciences curriculum can build student strengths across subject areas, writes arts education officer John Ceschini.
When his students write poems, they reveal the gap between who they are and who they might become, teacher Kip Zegers says.
Jay P. Greene and a team of researchers studied and measured how arts experiences boost critical thinking for students.
Arts represent a vital piece of the K-12 education experience, Jean Hendrickson writes.
Illustrator Jeff Dekal shares his perspective on being a young artist in the K-12 classroom.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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