November 5, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 11
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The college-bridge programs created 50 years ago under President Lyndon B. Johnson's signature program were never designed—or funded—to serve all the students who need them.
With the achievement of minority boys in the national spotlight, some big-city school districts are forging ahead with new, and not so new, strategies. is training teachers to evaluate how well textbooks align with the common-core standards. The nonprofit group will start publishing Consumer Reports-style reviews early next year.
As the charter sector matures, it faces increasing pressure to close schools that fail to perform—a situation that could become more common.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
While there are widely held beliefs about the "profile" of a student shooter, acts of school violence have been carried out by attackers of all races, ages, disciplinary histories, and family backgrounds.
An Ohio higher education coalition is the first to win a new prize for metropolitan areas that boost their numbers of college graduates.
Best of the Blogs
The popularity of social-media sites and the increasing ability of software to analyze information give members of the class of 2015 more online tools than ever to help chart their next step.
Democrats and Republicans alike are pitching proposals on issues such as college preparation for disadvantaged students, tuition-assistance grants, and federal student loans.
Though most states are seeking some of the $250 million in federal aid for expanded preschool, there's been partisan tension in a handful that didn't apply.
Some Obama administration officials behind key education initiatives have moved on, and those now in place bring their own approaches and perspectives.
In her recent public criticism of former L.A. schools chief John Deasy, the president of the American Federation of Teachers does not encourage civil dialogue, writes Peter Cunningham.
Accurate data are crucial for determining whether teacher-candidates are prepared for the classroom, write Mary Brabeck and Frank C. Worrell.
Beyond Ebola, U.S. schools can take precautions to promote good health, says public-health official Dr. Georges Benjamin.
Teachers can take cues from brain research to boost student learning, writes Benedict Carey of The New York Times.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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