October 15, 2014

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Vol. 34, Issue 08
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A new report claims "the future of the common core remains uncertain at this important juncture" because many districts are not yet fully prepared to impart the new academic expectations in reading and math.
Collinswood Language Academy's experiences with two-way language learning illustrate why North Carolina state education officials are sold on the idea.
Florida is wading into largely uncharted waters with an effort to fuel collaboration between regular public schools and charters, at a time when several big-city districts have sought similar ties.
A study of 7th graders from two Connecticut school districts finds a significant achievement gap for the ability to read information critically on the Internet.
Incumbent Republican Gov. Rick Scott and Democratic challenger Charlie Crist are both pledging greater financial support for schools in their close election contest.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Too many students are 'missing opportunities' to take rigorous courses—and potentially boost their SAT scores, says the board.
The Educational Testing Service, with the help of a nonprofit specializing in teacher practice, is planning to release a new assessment capable of measuring teacher-candidates' ability to execute key aspects of instruction.
The state is scrambling to hire a company to administer winter tests used for high school graduation after McGraw-Hill Education CTB withdrew from a proposed contract.
Best of the Blogs
University of Connecticut researcher Donald J. Leu talks about his recent findings showing that lower family income is linked to weaker online-reading skills for middle school students.
Depending on which party takes control of the chamber, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., or Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., is seen as most likely to helm the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.
Legislation in Congress would open the door to "staggered testing," letting states give summative exams only in certain grades in a departure from the NCLB testing regime.
Investing in children's social and emotional development yields significant academic and economic benefits, write three early-education advocates.
To improve their practice, educators need early access to information on student performance, Irving Hamer says.
A high school junior argues that the widespread use of technology in K-12 classrooms is highly overrated.
Letters
Teachers should consider how biases about minority-student fashion and style may influence their actions, Darius Prier says.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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