October 1, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 34, Issue 06
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The U.S. Supreme Court has gone five years without hearing a single case involving a school district or local school official as the party bringing the case or as the respondent.
Most of the biggest contracts being awarded by the two main consortia creating online assessments aligned to the standards are flowing to some familiar industry players.
School district police units around the country have acquired armored vehicles, semiautomatic weapons, and grenade launchers through a controversial program run by the Defense Department.
Accountability, governance, common standards, and funding are among the top issues in the tight races for governor and state schools superintendent in Georgia.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
New research finds that students in schools that used deeper-learning teaching approaches had better test results and people skills than peers in other schools.
In a new survey of superintendents from Gallup and Education Week, most school district chiefs say they want states to stay the course on common-core tests.
The academic boost that elementary students got from a program that linked them with community supports and resources lasted all the way to middle school, a study says.
Gwinnett County, Ga., and Orange County, Fla., were the two winners—and the only two finalists—for the prestigious Broad Urban Education Prize.
Best of the Blogs
Of all the testing organizations prospering in the common-core era, few have fought as doggedly in public for a competitive edge as the American Institutes for Research.
This special report aims to give district leaders a better sense of what it takes to piece together a smart strategy for learning management systems.
Federal officials face a split among advocates and educators on whether to set a bright line for states in deciding if minorities are overidentified for special education services.
More than a third of states with NCLB waivers say they’re interested in a federal offer to put off using student scores as part of teacher evaluations until the end of the school year.
The PARCC testing consortium says schools should set aside 10 to 11 hours or more for its assessments.
In spite of our tendency to revere the counsel of business leaders on public-policy issues, they don't always get it right, argues David Bernstein.
When students approach reading as only an exercise in seeking out evidence, as the common core recommends, they risk missing out on the value of reading for intrinsic literary value, writes Mia Hood.
Polling data show that teachers who are supported and respected by their schools inspire engaged, hopeful students better able to succeed in school and life, Gallup’s Brandon Busteed says.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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