September 24, 2014

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Vol. 34, Issue 05
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School districts are zeroing in on such vague definitions as they seek to craft discipline policies that are more consistent and equitable, and that avoid overly harsh penalties for minor infractions.
An Education Week analysis has found an array of often-complicated state policies guiding how teachers are fired, and their rights to appeal such actions.
Aftershocks continue from the 1989 meeting in Charlottesville, Va., where the White House and the nation's governors took an aggressive turn toward standards-based accountability in public education.
Some mathematics experts worry the computer-based testing platforms will hamper a key element of the exams: open-ended math-performance tasks that test students' ability to apply their knowledge.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Comments are being sought on updated standards for what principals, assistant principals, superintendents, and other district heads should know and do.
Public and private financing is not keeping up with demand for charters, says the report, which also highlights how states can make it easier for the schools to pay for facilities.
Students looking to prepare for Advanced Placement exams, or simply expand their academic knowledge, now have free access to an array of classes.
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Congress appears ready to make a pair of education-related bills among the first bound for the president's desk in its upcoming lame-duck session.
The controversial standards share the stage with school finance in the campaign for Arizona's top state schools job, creating some unlikely alliances for this year's election.
If federal officials would dedicate one penny of every dollar spent on K-12 learning to education research, the payback would be enormous, Robert Balfanz writes.
Mike Schmoker argues that while we shouldn't abandon the standards, teachers need time to pilot them.
Jeff Baxter, the Kansas State Teacher of the Year, writes that the standards have made him a better educator.
We need to change the system so that some in K-12 can truly innovate, while others stick to tradition but improve incrementally, Ted Kolderie says.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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