August 27, 2014

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Vol. 34, Issue 02
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Local districts are walking a tightrope between returning to the normal routine while acknowledging the street protests and larger debate about race and law enforcement sparked by the fatal shooting in Ferguson, Mo.
Despite having relatively strong representation on school boards, women serving on those panels tend to yield to their male counterparts on policy decisions, according to a new book.
The school district, along with the local teachers' union, has worked to transform the traditional pay schedule into one emphasizing professional accomplishments over credentials and seniority.
A shakeup at StudentsFirst puts the spotlight on similar organizations as they look to balance their broader profiles with local advocacy and coalition building.
Over the coming months, high-profile players in the student-survey field plan to launch new efforts to improve the usefulness, and potentially lower the costs, of their survey instruments.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Like tens of thousands of unaccompanied immigrant children who've arrived in the country since last fall, David brings harsh memories, and his family’s hopes, as he starts middle school in the District of Columbia.
A pair of wide-ranging polls by PDK/Gallup and Education Next gauge sentiment on the common standards, testing, school funding, and other hot-button issues.
More students than ever are taking the college-entrance exam, including a record 57 percent of the 2014 high school graduating class.
After decades of false starts and unkept promises, makers of virtual-reality technology could be ready to give students a new and potentially powerful way to learn.
Best of the Blogs
Most states are feeling a modest funding lift, experts on education finance say, but revenue streams remain unstable.
Partisan gridlock has stalled action on major education legislation in Congress, and analysts are split on how a GOP takeover would affect that.
The Education Department will let states with NCLB waivers seek a delay in tying student test scores to teacher evaluations until the 2015-16 school year.
It doesn't take more work, just a shift in approach, for schools to teach systems thinking, write bestselling authors Daniel Goleman and Peter Senge.
The absence of evidence around charter school effectiveness hasn't shaken the devotees, including within the Obama administration, argues Gerald N. Tirozzi.
In something of a farewell policy address, Chester E. Finn Jr. writes that American schools have made progress, but the public education governance structure is "obsolete."
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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