August 20, 2014

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Vol. 34, Issue 01
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A new organization billing itself as a "Consumer Reports for school materials" will soon begin posting online reviews of major textbooks and curricula that purport to align with the common-core standards.
States still relish flexibility from portions of the outdated law, but critics grumble about a thicket of federal conditions and second-guessing.
For the first time, the overall number of Latino, African-American, and Asian students in public K-12 schools is expected to surpass the number of non-Hispanic white students.
Some see the independent, statewide panels as a way to improve the quality of charters; others aren't so sure.
Researchers say teachers and policymakers can learn a lot about students' mindsets and school climate by watching how students get the help they need in class.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Correction
Report Roundup
Education data crunchers are seeking an alternative to the current yardstick—the percentage of students who qualify for free and reduced-price school meals.
Despite frustrations, the state's new school funding structure is winning praise for providing more money and spending autonomy for schools serving needy students.
New studies suggest that teaching students to be more persistent and conscientious may not be the right strategy for motivating those with a creative bent.
Despite increased professional development for teaching to the new standards, about half of teachers surveyed do not feel the preparation has been adequate.
Developers hoping to transform digital learning games from lightweight classroom fun to serious instructional tools could soon have access to new technologies to help make that happen.
Best of the Blogs
Springdale, Ark., Superintendent Jim D. Rollins shares lessons from his district’s rapid transition to a majority-minority school system.
The demographic transformation of American classrooms was not unexpected. This timeline tracks changes in U.S. immigration laws.
Waivers from NCLB mandates are among the items named by House Republicans in authorizing a suit against President Barack Obama over alleged executive overreach.
Renewal of the higher education law offers a rare change for bipartisan cooperation in Congress, even as the House and Senate are charting different courses.
The new budget gives teachers an average increase of 7 percent in the coming year, but radically revamps the existing salary schedule in a way some veterans don’t like.
Dozens of state could tap into a new, $250 million pot of federal money under the Preschool Development Grant competition.
Arthur Levine shares lessons learned in the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's efforts to attract and prepare high-ability teacher-candidates for work in struggling schools.
Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders represent a wide range of individuals with varying educational strengths and needs, Rich Lee says.
The standardized teacher evaluation assumes an approach to learning that doesn't necessarily reflect what's happening in the classroom, writes Michael Q. McShane.
Letters
It's time to untangle the logistical knots and administrative hurdles that surround choice and charters in many places, Robin Lake writes.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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