July 9, 2014

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Vol. 33, Issue 36
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Amid intense debate over the common core, 10 states have recently enacted laws that place new restrictions or specifications on how state boards of education adopt standards
From California to Maryland, schools are preparing for an unprecedented increase in the flow of Central American children and youths streaming across the U.S.-Mexico border and arriving alone.
From sexual harassment to the glass ceiling, the challenges women face in the workplace are suddenly front and center in the educational technology world.
One of the earliest winners in the federal grant competition is working to make sure its efforts to transform public education don't slip away when its $500 million runs out.
The decision by a California judge declaring unconstitutional key aspects of teacher tenure and due-process protections has made waves, but the implications in that state and beyond remain unclear.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Report is the third post mortem on last year's closures, which shut down 49 schools and affected nearly 12,000 students.
President Obama's pledge to improve schools for 50,000 Native American students comes after years of scathing reports and complaints about the Bureau of Indian Education.
Model standards used nationwide to prepare, guide, and evaluate school leaders—including principals, their supervisors, and superintendents—are being revised to reflect the jobs' changing roles.
Schools and districts now have until Aug. 31 to opt for a new federal provision that allows them to serve free meals to all students.
Despite opposition from a new mayor and the community, the state-appointed schools chief for the New Jersey district has agreed to stick around for three more years.
Best of the Blogs
Lily Eskelsen GarcĂ­a was chosen as the next president of the National Education Association.
A new survey conducted by Gallup in partnership with Education Week probes the views of superintendents on the common core, teacher recruitment and evaluation, and district finances, among other topics.
By backing research and speaking out on the topic, the technology giant is encouraging school officials across the country to demand strong student-data privacy.
Schools and libraries hungry for faster and more reliably funded Wi-Fi connections will be watching the July 11 open meeting of the Federal Communications Commission closely.
OECD study finds that U.S. teachers spend significantly more hours per week working than their international peers and have have fewer opportunities for cross-classroom collaboration.
More than 16,000 educators, ed-tech company officials, researchers, and others swarmed the Georgia World Congress Center for the annual International Society for Technology in Education conference.
Federal reports show that many states with leeway from many NCLB mandates were cited for failing to follow through with plans to turn around their poorest-performing schools.
The U.S. Supreme Court stopped short of reversing a key precedent allowing public-worker unions to charge "agency fees" to nonmembers.
The justices dealt with several cases of interest to educators, including disputes involving race in college admissions, prayers at government meetings, and more.
Federal officials are looking more at how well students with disabilities are taught, and less on strict compliance with voluminous regulations.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal wants the state to jettison tests aligned with the common core, but the state schools chief and school board are balking.
Though they usually have years to overhaul academic standards, states backing out of the common core will have to craft new ones under a tight time frame.
Tennessee officials enlisted teachers early in key elements of the state's Race to the Top initiatives that affect the teaching force.
Faced with crafting complex applications for federal Race to the Top aid, and putting that money to work if they won, states turned to consultants for help.
In spite of being wary of excessive standardization, Dave Powell questions why elected officials are rejecting the common core.
States have failed to use federal leeway to update their accountability systems in meaningful ways, write Morgan Polikoff, Andrew McEachin, Stephani Wrabel, and Matthew Dugue.
Following the repeal of the standards, Oklahoma teacher Valeria Hughes wonders what's ahead for her state and her classroom.
Letters
Schools get better, more useful information from performance assessments and collaboration than from standardized exams, Greg Jouriles says.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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