April 23, 2014

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Vol. 33, Issue 29
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Some of the president's high-profile K-12 programs may have an uncertain future without strong patrons in Congress or a formal anchor in federal law.
The architects of one of the best-known gauges of student achievement—the National Assessment of Educational Progress—are preparing for a dramatic expansion of technology-based assessment.
In return for abolishing tenure, lawmakers are making districts offer raises to a quarter of their teachers, a quota administrators' and teachers' associations are protesting.
Recognizing the important role social and emotional factors can play in academic success, some schools are enlisting energetic students to mentor their peers.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A new report cites inaccurate assessments of the needs of students entering the system, poor coordination between teaching and learning, and inconsistency in curricula as significant problems.
After a recent knife attack at a Pennsylvania high school, experts say educators should be prepared to respond to a range of potentially dangerous situations.
Specialized texts serve older students reading many levels below their peers, but some ask how they align with requirements of the common core.
A federal lawsuit alleges that the online education provider K12 Inc. misled investors, and says that the company’s former CEO benefited by selling off stock before the company’s stock price fell.
Citing insurmountable administrative and financial challenges, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards voted to end its efforts to develop advanced certification for principals.
The new exam, described as an "achievement test," aims to judge students' in such areas as analysis, synthesis, and real-world problem-solving.
With a federal lawsuit pending, and more scrutiny about its practices, Google updated its terms of service and privacy policies about how it uses private data.
Best of the Blogs
This special report explores how the initial vision for the standards—and for aligned assessments—is now bumping up against reality in states, school districts, and local communities.
Standards implementation, pre-K, and teacher preparation are high on the to-do list items for the U.S. Secretary of Education as the administration heads deeper into its final term.
A lawsuit alleges that New Mexico's A-F grading system for schools and its teacher-evaluation policies cause an unfair distribution of resources for schools.
To prepare students to be productive, forward-thinking individuals, districts must offer a range of accessible, high-quality, innovative schooling options, writes Heather Zavadsky.
Twenty years after an article appeared in Teacher Magazine about the state of teacher education at one university, Ellis Hurd and Gary Weilbacher weigh in on where the program and teacher education stand today.
Meeting each child where he or she is in early childhood and increasing out-of-school learning experiences are some of the ways to strengthen our weakened education system and drive K-12 results, writes Paul Reville.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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