March 26, 2014

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Vol. 33, Issue 26
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The company acknowledges scanning the emails of Apps for Education users and faces allegations in a federal lawsuit that it built "surreptitious user profiles" for advertising purposes.
More than 4 million students in 36 states and the District of Columbia will take near-final versions of the math and English/language arts tests between March 24 and June 6.
The housing programs expanded through the War on Poverty provide stability for many assisted families, but their children still often grow up in concentrated poverty and struggle academically.
Principals spend only a small fraction of their day on instruction-related duties, and new research suggests that some of that time may be wasted.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Correction
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The superintendent, appointed by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, is drawing strong resistance to her efforts to expand the city's charter presence, dismiss teachers, and sell off school buildings.
New federal civil rights data show persistent and widespread disparities for disadvantaged students on key education indicators, from pre-K through high school.
Research disputing the idea that racial isolation is on the rise in American schools has ignited a scholarly argument over how best to measure school segregation.
A private equity company plans to acquire Renaissance Learning for $1.1 billion in a deal that will be one of the largest acquisitions ever in educational technology.
New federal regulatory guidance that allows charter schools to hold weighted admissions lotteries in favor of disadvantaged students could make a long-term impact on charter enrollments.
Best of the Blogs
A sample of English-learners and students with disabilities in California scored better when parts of the NAEP reading-comprehension test were read aloud to them.
When housing programs fail to break up concentrated poverty in neighborhoods, some experts argue that school districts should step in to promote economic diversity in the classroom.
States sharing $4 billion in the federal competitive grants are delivering on some promises, but continue to struggle on teacher evaluations, the U.S. Department of Education finds.
With its NCLB waiver in hot water with the U.S. Department of Education, Washington state could end up showing what happens if a state loses that flexibility.
States would have to pay closer attention to the quality and safety of federally funded centers under a measure making over the Child Care and Development Block Grant program.
Politicians and K-12 advocates in a number of states are wrangling over mandates for education aid, even as the Kansas funding system gets struck down by that state’s high court.
Advocacy groups argue the federal decision to let California bump accountability decisions to 2016 could jeopardize moves affecting key student subgroups.
State of the States
Caitlin Hannon and others from Teach Plus Indianapolis exhort teacher-prep programs to raise admission standards, offer transparent data on post-graduation results, and engage alumni for feedback.
Drawing on school-discipline data, a group of Oregon districts is working to improve equity in addressing student misbehavior, Beaverton, Ore., Superintendent Jeff Rose writes.
If the common-core standards are to succeed, the deeper learning and thinking they promote must be adopted by teachers, as well as students, writes David Ruenzel.
Letters
Richard Rothstein writes about the oft-overlooked history of government-sanctioned segregated housing policy and its continuing impact on schools and minority achievement.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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