March 12, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 33, Issue 24
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The College Board seeks to more closely connect its exam to work students do in rigorous high school courses. The plans also offer strong common-core echoes.
A controversial gamble by Philadelphia Superintendent William R. Hite to expand innovative school models is revealing the difficulties of changing and improving how students are taught.
Critics of high-stakes testing believe having parents refuse to let their children take assessments could force policymakers to take note of their cause.
From governance to the common core, hot-button education issues have fueled fierce debate among education leaders and lawmakers.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
The launch of two new pilot projects signals a shift in direction for the national teacher-training and -placement organization.
Educators gathered recently for training on how to size up instructional resources for possible inclusion in a digital library that a common-core testing consortium is developing.
Angered by Mayor Bill de Blasio's decision to rescind co-location agreements for some charter schools, thousands of protesters took their fight to the state capitol.
State officials say better data on the youngest children will help educators gauge their academic needs, but some raise privacy concerns with sharing such information more broadly.
About 6,000 educators, entrepreneurs, and other innovation-minded people gathered in Austin, Texas, to talk about how technological advances are fueling improvements in education.
Best of the Blogs
The initiative is billed as an effort to level the playing field for disadvantaged young people by providing an array of free, high-quality resources.
All three of the newly approved schools will feature project-based learning, push students to learn outside the walls of traditional classrooms, and incorporate online education.
Districts and states would get federal incentive grants to help bridge the achievement gap between poor and minority students and their more advantaged peers under a federal budget plan that faces an uphill climb on Capitol Hill.
A law that lets students transfer out of unaccredited districts is forcing debate over what the state should do for school systems on the brink of failing.
State of the States
Teachers in Indiana may be a step ahead of the state's policymakers in implementing sweeping academic standards.
For some students, high-quality career and technical education offers a better fit and future than preparation for college, Jean Evans Davila writes.
Meaningful assessment of teacher preparation must be founded on strong research methodology and focused on program outcomes, writes Gerardo M. Gonzalez.
A special education teacher's experiences in a French school led her to see value in teaching children to write by hand, rather than by redirecting children to keyboarding when they struggle with writing.
Letters
Sound assessments are integral to good teaching and learning, but they must not be used beyond their technical limits, writes Madhabi Chatterji.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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