Feb. 26, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 33, Issue 22
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Entrepreneurial growth in U.S. cities is generated more by high school diplomas and college degrees than by venture capital investments or government funding, says new research.
With a federal NCLB waiver prodding it along, Minnesota pushes hard to cut disparities between various subgroups of students.
Competition from free, public preschool programs can siphon off clients from private early-education providers and potentially limit options in some communities.
The subject is getting a fresh look from state and local policymakers, with many pushing measures to expand access to computing courses.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
The test-maker says the goal of its new offering is to serve not only as an assessment, but also as a learning tool for prospective educators.
The charter-management group in Chicago is taking a novel approach to building a corps of highly qualified, and racially diverse, teacher-candidates by recruiting its alumni.
Best of the Blogs
The pressure on schools to upgrade their technology is growing very fast right now, but they will not see the new E-rate dollars until 2015.
A spate of GOP-sponsored legislation targets what critics see as an improper federal role in boosting the common academic standards.
Legislators in some states say that putting school board elections on the same calendar as other local races could boost often-anemic turnout.
Only Pennsylvania fully links up data between five major early-childhood programs and its own K-12 data system, a new survey finds.
Even though it's a state under Democratic control, California's education policies do not fall in line with those of the Obama administration, writes Charles Taylor Kerchner.
"Individualized learning plans" empower students to plot a postsecondary course, whether for college or careers, write V. Scott Solberg and Curtis Richards.
Students need outdoor recess and movement throughout the day in order to stay focused and perform better academically, writes Debbie Rhea.
Letters
School leaders must take concrete action to attract black men into K-12 teaching, an area where they are now grossly underrepresented, says Donald G. Nicolas.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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