Feb. 19, 2014

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Vol. 33, Issue 21
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The U.S. Department of Education is developing a 50-state strategy to put teeth into the push for equitable distribution of the nation's best teachers.
The practice of assigning teachers to subject-specific classes, long a staple of middle and high schools, is gaining ground at the elementary level.
The state's STEM school is expanding its influence beyond campus with outreach initiatives, including after-school, summer, and professional-development programs.
State education officials cite a litany of reasons for rejecting a recent group of applications, highlighting potential governance problems as a major concern.
Teachers' unions find themselves navigating a tricky course on the Common Core State Standards amid concerns from some in the rank and file.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Correction
Report Roundup
With many students entering college ill prepared to succeed, states and districts are increasingly offering transitional coursework for high schoolers who need extra help.
A Salt Lake City cafeteria worker's decision to take school lunches away from students with unpaid lunch bills has prompted a call for federal guidance on how to handle students' debts.
The program to upgrade schools' Web connectivity will be getting $2 billion in repurposed E-rate dollars and $750 million in goods and services from seven companies.
The newest of these districts and schools are using flexibility from some state requirements to focus on technology, employ crowdsourcing techniques, and target low-performing schools.
Just 3 percent of school superintendents rate business leaders as "well-informed" about public education, and 14 percent say they are actually misinformed, a new survey finds.
A group of prominent schools chiefs want the next version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to include fewer testing requirements and more leeway for high-performing districts.
The Wallace Foundation is planning to sink $24 million into a new six-district initiative to improve the conditions and skill sets of principal supervisors.
Best of the Blogs
As the issue gains momentum, lawmakers are debating the right role for the federal government in early-childhood education, with a variety of proposals on the table.
States have been allowed to back off from the core goal of educational equity, a group of powerful House Democrats tell the U.S. Department of Education.
State of the States
State of the States
U.S. Reps. Jared Polis, D-Colo., and Chris Gibson, R-N.Y., write that it's time to expand and modernize the country's E-rate program to level the digital playing field for students.
An equitable finance formula must consider whether the proportion of state aid is enough to level the playing field between rich and poor districts, write Marin Gjaja, J. Puckett, and Matt Ryder.
Principals and other leaders must make tuning into their schools' emotional climates a priority, write Kyle E. Blanchfield and Peter D. Ladd.
Letters
Letters
Anti-bullying programs that aren't tied to a greater understanding of emotions and their consequences are not effective, write Marc A. Brackett and Susan E. Rivers.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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