Jan. 29, 2014

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Vol. 33, Issue 19
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Chambers of commerce in a growing number of states are defending the common core against vocal opposition to the standards from some of their traditional Republican allies.
The decision is being interpreted as giving commercial Internet providers significantly more power to block content or set conditions on its delivery before it reaches customers, including schools.
Wide disparities between students with disabilities and those in regular education could complicate performance factors when states undergo federal evaluation.
A lengthy investigation into cheating on state tests in Philadelphia came to a head this month.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Preoccupation with implementing the common core for math and literacy is an oft-cited obstacle in states to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards.
The number of charters may soon double in North Carolina, thanks to new laws lifting the state's charter cap and easing other restrictions on the schools.
This special report examines the opportunities and persistent questions that surround schools' and districts' implementation of blended learning.
States and districts getting School Improvement Grant aid could receive greater flexibility under language included in the federal spending measure.
The U.S. Department of Education is grilling states that don't participate in one of the common-core-testing consortia about their assessment plans.
South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley tells lawmakers that she intends to direct more resources to the state's neediest students and push to improve public school technology.
State of the States
Best of the Blogs
State of the States
Pregnant women, infants, and children up to age 3 could end up as big beneficiaries of the $1 billion in early-education aid in the recently passed federal spending measure.
The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a dispute with the potential to shake up the landscape for teachers' unions and other public-sector labor groups.
Funding for prekindergarten should be tied to students, not programs, in order to encourage innovation and prevent wasteful spending, write Ben Zimmer and Daniella Rohr.
In response to the growing interest in all-things statistics, it's time to foster data literacy in our classrooms, writes Anna E. Bargagliotti.
The drive that advanced the Protestant Reformation should give educators hope and inspiration for their own push to shake up American schools, Clarke L. Rubel says.
In far too many cases, incarcerated youths lose out on their access to education when they go to jail for committing a crime, Lynette Tannis writes.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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