Jan. 22, 2014

This Issue
Vol. 33, Issue 18
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U.S. Rep. George Miller, leaving Congress after four decades, helped push through game-changing legislation, including the No Child Left Behind Act.
While child poverty remains a stubborn enemy, the federal anti-poverty initiative launched by President Lyndon B. Johnson has led to health and IQ gains for disadvantaged students.
Early results suggest the new state policy, which targets the 100 lowest-performing elementary schools in the Sunshine State, may be paying off.
Privacy advocates say the increased collection, storage, and sharing of educational data entails real threats to children and families, and some high-profile incidents have led to new legislation, legal action, and formal complaints.
News in Brief
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
A federal judge has approved a settlement to allow Arkansas to phase out millions of dollars in school desegregation aid to three Little Rock-area districts.
The dispute between the district and the teachers' union over the jointly designed system shows the stark distinction between ambitious policy plans and the realities of implementation.
Some states are facing a bumpy transition as they adjust to the altered assessment landscape and had to cope with a late 2013 surge in test-takers.
Concerns over costs and student privacy have spurred districts in Delaware, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, and Ohio to withdraw from the federal school improvement program.
An improving economy, schools' greater reliance on digital resources, and demand for common-core materials are creating new revenues, two recent reports suggest.
Best of the Blogs
Fifty years after the War on Poverty began, schools serving children in Cincinnati's West End are still largely segregated by economics and race.
Since the War on Poverty, the average gap in per-pupil spending between two states grew by 256 percent, an Education Week analysis finds.
Early education is a winner in the massive bill worked out in Congress, but key Obama initiatives come up short.
A new law that requires schools to allow transgender students to use the restrooms and locker rooms that align with their gender identity faces a recall effort.
State of the States
State of the States
Small schools in New York City offer a test case for the benefits of small high schools, but also underscore problems of race and social-class segregation they may inadvertently promote, Bruce Fuller writes.
The common standards offer an opportunity to level the playing field for all students regardless of their ZIP code, income, race, or ethnicity, Rufina Hernández writes.
When students crack open a book of questionable literary merit in their free time, teachers and parents should see it as a valuable exercise, not a waste of time, write Jeffrey D. Wilhelm and Michael W. Smith.
Letters
The steep competition over test scores in China has taken a toll on students' physical and mental health, write Xu Zhao, Helen Haste, and Robert L. Sherman.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the GE Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the HOPE Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Noyce Foundation, the Panasonic Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and an anonymous funder. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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