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Determining the Fate of Charter Schools

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The ability to close schools that are not up to snuff is a fundamental principle of charter schooling. The publicly funded but independently run schools receive greater autonomy than most other public schools in return for a promise to be held accountable for results. If a school isn't working, charter advocates say, shut it down.

But the "shut-down" process isn't always easy. Schools often resist and, even when states cite substantial administrative or academic failings, schools also have the option of taking their case to court, thus prolonging the process.

How should charter schools be monitored—and who should determine their fate?

September 25, 2016 | Receive RSS RSS feeds

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