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Live Chat: Are Local School Boards Obsolete?

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Thursday, October 22, 3 p.m. Eastern time
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Are local school boards obsolete? Or are they an essential part of the American system of K-12 education? As states and the federal government have come to play a larger role in education policymaking, boards have seen their roles change. Some communities, such as Pittsburgh, are making an effort to hold their elected board members accountable by closely monitoring their meetings. In other cities, such as Hartford, Conn., school board members have undergone extensive training with school administrators to get on the same page about a "theory of action" for change. And in some cities, mayors have taken control of school systems, sidelining school boards in the process. Join us for a spirited discussion on the relevance of school boards.

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Guests:
Anne L. Bryant, executive director, National School Boards Association
Carey Harris, executive director, A+ Schools: Pittsburgh’s Community Alliance for Public Education; founder of the Board Watch program
Lesli A. Maxwell, staff writer, Education Week, will moderate this chat.

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