Published Online: May 19, 2015
Published in Print: May 20, 2015, as Sports Injury

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Sports Injury

"Academic Effects of Concussion in Children and Adolescents"

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While recovering from the symptoms of a concussion, a vast majority of students reported having one or more issues that impaired their academic work, including headaches, problems paying attention, and difficulty studying or understanding material, according to a new study published online last week in the journal Pediatrics.

The study’s authors examined 349 students between the ages of 5 and 18 who sustained a concussion and underwent an initial evaluation within 28 days of the injury. Clinicians divided the children into two groups: those who had recovered from their concussions and those who had not yet recovered.

Among the 109 students who had fully recovered from their concussions, just five reported having headaches interfere with their academic work, eight had problems paying attention, and 11 said they were feeling too tired.

Of the 240 who had not yet recovered, however, 121 had headaches interfering with their work, 106 had problems paying attention, and 95 felt tired. Many more of the not-yet-recovered students also reported having to spend more time on homework, difficulty understanding material and studying, and difficulty taking class notes.

Researchers said the range of symptoms suggests a need for “targeted supports” to students during the recovery period.

Vol. 34, Issue 31, Page 5

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