Published Online: June 4, 2003
Published in Print: June 4, 2003, as Grants

Departments

Grants

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints

GRANTS AWARDED
From Corporate Sources | From Private Sources

GRANTS AVAILABLE
From Corporate Sources | From Private Sources | From Federal Sources


GRANTS AWARDED

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

NEC FOUNDATION GRANT
The NEC Foundation of America, the philanthropic arm of the NEC Corporation, an international research and development company based in Tokyo, Japan, recently awarded six grants totaling $254,000. The grants support the development of technology education to assist children and adults with disabilities.

The winners are listed below.

Challenger Center for Space Education, Alexandria, Va.; Global Action Project, Inc., New York City; MathCounts Foundation, Alexandria, Va.; National Center for Disability Services, Albertson, N.Y.; National Down Syndrome Society, New York City; National Task Force on Technology and Disability, Flint, Mich.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM GRANT
The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, a private philanthropic organization based in Flint, Mich., recently awarded a four-year $3.6 million grant to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The grant will support the evaluation of best practices in school-based and school-linked after-school programs.

LITERACY GRANT
The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded a two-year, $175,000 grant to the Environmental Literacy Council, based in Washington.
The grant will fund the development of environmental history teaching guides, which will assist history teachers and students by providing documentation on the impact of natural resources and technological advances throughout American history.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GRANT
The U.S Department of Justice has awarded 120, three-year COPS in Schools program grants to law enforcement agencies nationwide.
The grants will fund the training, salaries and benefits of school resource officers assigned to protect schools. The recipients are listed alphabetically by state.

Arkansas: City of Quitman; Jacksonville Police Department.

Arizona: Town of Buckeye.

California: Elk Grove Unified School District Police; Eureka Police Department; Seaside Police Department; Union City.

Colorado: Aspen Police Department; City of Northglenn; Ft. Lupton Police Department; Golden Police Department; Lamar Police Department.

Connecticut: Easton Police Department; Town of West Hartford.

Florida: City of Apalachicola; County of Columbia; Desoto Sheriff's Department; Levy County Board of Commissioners; St. Cloud Police Department.

Georgia: Blackshear Police Department; City of Winder; Early County Sheriff's Office; Toombs County Sheriff's Department.

Iowa: City of Huxley; Marshalltown Police Department.

Idaho: Aberdeen Police Department; Bingham County Sheriff's Department; Shoshone Bannock Tribes.

Illinois: City of Havana; Macomb Police Department; Maroa Police Department; Perry County Sheriff's Department; Village of Johnsburg; Village of Streamwood; Village of Thornton.

Indiana: City of Boonville; Floyd County Sheriff's Department; North Vernon Police Department.

Kentucky: Fleming County Sheriff's Office.

Louisiana: Law Enforcement District of Allen Parish.

Massachusetts: Acton Police Department; Bourne Police Department; City of Lowell; Dalton Police Department; Freetown Police Department; Seekonk Police Department; Town of Plymouth.

Maryland: Town of Princess Anne.

Maine: Town of Kittery.

Michigan: City of Wayne Police Department; Osceola County Sheriff's Department; Township of Marenisco.

Minnesota: City of Stillwater; City of Waite Park; Cloquet Police Department; Moorhead Police Department; Kandiyohi County Sheriff's Department; Redwood Falls Police Department; Wabasha Police Department.

Missouri: City of Grandview; City of Normandy; Charleston Department of Public Safety; Polk County Sheriff's Department; O'Fallon Police Department; University City.

Mississippi: Okolona Police Department.

Montana: Ft. Belknap Indian Community.

North Carolina: Bertie County; Davie County.

New Hampshire: Moultonboro Police Department.

New Jersey: Borough of Paulsboro; Garfield Police Department; Madison Police Department; Township of Lyndhurst; Township of Ocean; Township of Sparta Police Department; Township of Wall.

New York: City of Tonawanda; Hudson Police Department; Madison County Sheriff's Department; Stony Point Police Department; Town of Lloyd; Village of Avon Police Department; Village of Elmira Heights.

Ohio: City of Cortland; Marion Police Department; Piqua Police Department; Portsmouth; West Liberty Police Department.

Oklahoma: Arkoma Police Department; City of Stroud; Coweta Police Department; Hughes County Sheriff's Department.

Oregon: Canby Police Department; City of Prineville; Wallowa County Sheriff's Department.

Pennsylvania: Borough of Berwick; Borough of Knox; Penbrook Police Department.

South Carolina: Dorchester County Sheriff's Department.

Tennessee: Benton Police Department; Blaine Police Department; Obion County Sheriff's Department; Sevier County Sheriff's Department

Texas: Angelina County Sheriff's Department; Argyle Police Department; City of Cedar Park; City of Sinton; Devine Police Department; El Paso County Sheriff's Department; Stephenville Police Department; Nocona Police Department.

Utah: City of Sandy.

Virginia: City of Alexandria; Colonial Heights Police Department; Gloucester County Sheriff's Department.

Washington: City of Chehalis; East Wenatchee Police Department;Shelton Police Department.

Wisconsin: Florence County.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

Applications are due June 15 for the Jordan Fundamentals Grants, sponsored by the Jordan brand, a division of NIKE, Inc. The grants, which are administered by the Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of America, a national nonprofit educational support and student aid organization based in St. Peter, Minn., honor teachers who creatively instruct and support economically disadvantaged students in grades six through 12.
Teachers in schools where at least 40 percent of the student population qualifies for free or reduced-price lunches are eligible to apply. One-year grants ranging from $400- $2,500 are available.
Contact: Jordan fundamentals Grant Program, CSFA, 1505 Riverview Road, PO Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082; (507) 931-1682; email:
jordanfundamentals@csfa.org; Web site: www.nike.com/nikebiz.jhtml? page=26&item=jordan

Applications are due July 31 for education grants from Target stores nationwide. Grants support local schools and community organizations in need of arts, education, and family violence prevention funding. Grants from $1,000 to $5,000 are available.
Contact: Local Target Store for application; Web site: http://target.com/common/page.jhtml? content=target_cg_grant_guidelines.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Applications are due June 12 for teacher grants from the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support classroom teachers, schools and school districts that develop projects encouraging geographic skills and the uses of geography. Grants of up to $5,000 each are available. 
Contact: NGSEF, Attn: Grants Manager/Teacher Grant Proposals, 1145 17th St., N.W, Washington, DC 20036-4688; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/e ducation.

Applications are due June 30 for K-12 education grants from the Braitmayer Foundation, a private nonprofit organization based in Marion, Mass. Grants support K-12 curricular and school reform, professional development for teachers, and community education. Grants of up to $35,000 are available. 
Contact: Robert L. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Middlesex Corporate Center, 213 Court St., Suite 1101, Middletown, CT 06457-3351; (860) 638-5026; fax: (860) 638- 5069; Web site: www.braitmayerfoundation.org.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

Applications are due June 13 for Foreign Language Assistance grants from the U.S. Department of Education.
Grants support local educational agencies developing programs to establish or expand foreign language study for elementary and secondary school students. About 89 three-year grants averaging $112,500 are available.
Contact: Rebecca Richey, Itzetht Testa-Salcedo or Sharon Manassa, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 5617, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-6510; (202) 205-9717; e-mail: rebecca.richey@ed.gov, itzetht.testa-salcedo@ed.gov, or sharon.manassa@ed.gov.

Application s are due June 16 for Teacher Quality Enhancement grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of postsecondary education. Grants are awarded to states to implement programs that help improve the quality of new teachers by supporting statewide reform activities in teacher licensing and certification, accountability for high-quality teacher preparation, and recruitment. 
Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Montana, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, the Republic of Marshall Islands, the Republic of Palau, and the United States Virgin Islands are eligible to apply. Three grants averaging $2.5 million are available.
Contact: Luretha Kelley, Teacher Quality Program, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 1990 K St. N.W., Room 7096, Washington, DC 20006-8525; (202) 502-7878; fax: (202) 502-7864; e-mail: Luretha.Kelley@ed.gov.

Application s are due June 23 for Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of postsecondary education. The grants are awarded to eligible consortia to improve technology education for preservice teachers. 
Consortia composed of state and local educational agencies, state departments of education, institutions of higher education, and professional organizations— such as museums, libraries, and foundations—that can contribute technology- related reform for teacher programs are eligible to apply. Approximately 75 three-year grants ranging from $200,000 to $600,000 are available. 
Contact: Brenda Shade, U.S. Department of Education, 1990 K St., NW., Suite 7090, Washington, DC 20006-8526; (202) 502-7773; e-mail: brenda.shade@ed.gov.

Applications are due June 26 for Tech-Prep Demonstration Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of vocational and adult education. 
Grants are awarded to consortia composed of local educational agencies, vocational and technical schools serving secondary school students, secondary schools funded by the Bureau of Indian affairs, and nonprofit institutions of higher education, to help develop tech-prep education projects for secondary school students. Fourteen five-year grants averaging $650,000 are available.
Contact: Karen Stratman Clark, U.S Department of Education, 330 C St., S.W., Room 5523, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 205-3779; fax: (202) 401- 4079.

Applications are due June 30 for Advanced Placement Test Fees Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of innovation and improvement. Grants support the coverage of test fees for low-income students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses. 
State and local educational agencies are eligible to apply. Up to 50 grants totaling $3 million are available. 
Contact: Madeline E. Baggett, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3E228, Washington, DC 20202-6140; (202) 260-2502; e-mail: madeline.baggett@ed.gov.

Applica tions are due June 30 for Emergency Response and Crisis Management Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of safe and drug-free schools. Grants support the improvement of emergency response and crisis management plans including training for staff, students, and parents in emergency procedures. 
Local educational agencies that can demonstrate significant fiscal need are eligible to apply. About 150 18-month grants ranging from $100,000 to $500,000 are available. 
Contact: Connie Ann Deshpande or Jennifer Medearis, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.,Room 3E332, Washington, DC 20202-6450; (202) 401-2140 or (202) 260-5571; e-mail: Connie.Deshpande@ed.gov or Jennifer.Medearis@ed.gov

Applic ations are due July 1 for Reading First grants from the U.S. Department of Education. Grants are awarded to state and local educational agencies to promote reading programs in grades K-3. About 57 six-year grants are available. 
Contact: Chris Doherty or Sandi Jacobs, Reading First Program Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 2W108, Washington, DC 20202-6201; (202) 401-4877; e-mail: ReadingFirst@ed.gov; Web site: http://www.ed.gov/offices/OE SE/readingfirst.

Applications are due July 3 for Advanced Placement Incentives Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of innovation and improvement. Grants support programs that expand opportunities for low-income students to take Advanced Placement courses. 
State and local educational agencies, and national nonprofit educational organizations are eligible to apply. About 30 three-year grants totaling $10.7 million are available. 
Contact: Madeline E. Baggett, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3E228, Washington, DC 20202-6140; (202) 260-2502; e-mail: madeline.baggett@ed.gov.

Applica tions are due July 7 for the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program grants from the U.S Department of Education's office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support research programs that seek to develop or enhance elementary and secondary school programs for gifted and talented students. 
State and local educational agencies, universities, and private organizations are eligible to apply. Approximately 10 five-year grants ranging from $400,000 to $600,000, and 12 three-year grants ranging from $200,000-$300,000, are available. 
Contact: Lar'Mara O'Neal or Susan Toy, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-6200; (202) 205-1860 or (202) 260- 0995; e-mail: jacobk.javits@ed.gov.

Applications are due July 7 for the Cooperative Civic Education and Economic Education Exchange Program grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of safe and drug-free schools. Grants support the improvement of civic education exchange programs. 
U.S. organizations that develop curricula, civic programs, and government and economic education for foreign elementary and secondary schools are eligible to apply. One two-year grant of $2 million is available. 
Contact: Rita Foy Moss, U.S. Department of Education, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Room 513c, Washington, DC 20208-5573; (202) 219-2027; e-mail: rita.foy@ed.gov.

Applications are due July 7 for Teaching American History grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of innovation and improvement.
Grants support projects to improve teacher knowledge and understanding of American history. Local educational agencies, including charter schools, in partnership with nonprofit organizations, such as libraries, museums, and institutions of higher education, are eligible to apply. Up to 125 three-year grants averaging $500,000 are available. 
Contact: Christine Miller, Alex Stein, Harry Kessler, or Claire Geddes, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 5C126, Washington, DC 20202-6200; 202) 260-8766, (202) 205-9085, (202) 708- 9943; or (202) 260-8757; e-mail: teachingamericanhistory@ed.gov .

Applications are due July 10 for Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of innovation and improvement. Grants support the development and evaluation of programs that integrate arts into the core elementary and middle school curricula, strengthen arts, and improve student skills in the arts. 
Local educational agencies, charter schools, private organizations, educational nonprofits, and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply. About 30 three-year grants ranging from $293,000 to $860,000 are available. 
Contact: Diane Austin, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-6140; (202) 260-1280; e-mail: diane.austin@ed.gov.

Applications are due July 10 for Professional Development for Arts Educators grants from the U.S. Department of Education's office of innovation and improvement. 
Grants support the implementation of professional development programs in elementary and secondary education for music, dance, drama, and visual arts. 
State and local educational agencies, charter schools, and private organizations that serve schools where at least 75 percent of students are from low-income families, are eligible to apply. Three-year grants ranging from $250,000 to $325,000 are available. 
Contact: Lynyetta Johnson, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3E206 FB-6, Washington, DC 20202-6140; (202) 269-1990; e-mail: lynyetta.johnson@ed.gov.

Vol. 22, Issue 39, Page 34

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented