Published Online: March 12, 2003
Published in Print: March 12, 2003, as Grants

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GRANTS AWARDED
From Corporate Sources | From Private Sources | From Federal Sources

GRANTS AVAILABLE
From Corporate Sources | From Private Sources | From Federal Sources

GRANTS AWARDED

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

DIGI-BLOCK MATH GRANT

Digi-Block Inc., a Watertown, Mass.-based developer of elementary-level mathematics products, has awarded a $5,000 grant to Indian Brook Elementary School in Plymouth, Mass.
The grant will provide funding for curriculum development and help the school implement the Digi-Block Learning System by providing professional development for the school's K-2 teachers and teachers in nearby facilities.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

JEWISH FOUNDATION GRANT

The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, a New York City-based organization that offers educational materials to middle and high school teachers on the history of the Holocaust, awarded grants to two teachers.
Thomas White
, a high school teacher in Keene, N.H., received a $750 grant to support a communitywide event on Holocaust education. Bernadette Bennett, a social studies teacher in Sarasota, Fla., received a $550 grant to support a three-part, professional-development workshop highlighting "kindertransport," the rescue of children, during the Holocaust.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

NCLB ASSESSMENT GRANTS

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded nine state grants totaling $17 million to provide funding for projects that will improve assessment systems, particularly for students with disabilities and limited English proficiency, under the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001.
The recipients are: Colorado, Minnesota, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, and Wisconsin.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

Applications are due March 21 for Opportunity Grants from the BellSouth Foundation. Grants support educational programs for leadership, teacher quality, college-going minorities, and technology integration in the classroom.
K-12 school districts are eligible to apply. Grants up to $75,000 are available. Contact: grants.manager@bellsouth.com; Web site: www.bellsouthfoundation.org.

Applications are accepted at any time for small grants for programs that improve classroom teaching and learning of mathematics, science, and technology for students in grades 7-12, sponsored by the Toshiba America Foundation. Public and private schools, local education agencies, and youth organizations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico may apply. Projects should provide direct benefits to students and include teacher-led, classroom- based experiences. Grants of up to $5,000 are offered monthly throughout the year. Contact: TAF, Program Office, 1251 Avenue of the Americas, 41st Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 588-0820; e-mail: foundation@tai.toshiba.com; Web site: www.toshiba.com/about/taf.html .

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Applications are due March 31 for technology grants from the Beaumont Foundation of America. Grants pay for technology development in underserved schools.
The Foundation plans to award grants in 21 states and the District of Columbia this year and another series of grants in the remaining 29 states in 2004. Between 100 and 350 grants ranging from $60,000 to $200,000 are available. K- 12 public schools, including charter schools, as well as private schools, are eligible to apply if 50 percent of their students qualify for the National School Lunch Program.
Contact: BFA; (800) 505-2667; Web site: www.bmtfoundation.com.

Application s are due April 1 for the Kids Growing with Dutch Bulbs grants from the National Gardening Association. Grants support K-12 schools that utilize gardens as educational tools. About 500 grants providing 200 premium Dutch flowering bulbs are available.
Contact: NGA, 1100 Dorset St., South Burlington, VT 05403; (800) 538-7476; Web site: www.kidsgardening.com/grants.asp .

Applications are due April 4 for Champions of Active Learning grants from the Washington-based Public Education Network and New Visions for Public Schools, based in New York City. Grants support instructional programs that increase student achievement in middle schools.

Public school teachers who teach grades 5-8 in Bridgeport, Conn.; Columbus, Ohio; Houston; Los Angeles; Miami; Monroe, La.; Newark, N.J.; New York City; Paterson, N.J.; Rochester, N.Y.; San Francisco; Tempe, Ariz.; Wilmington, Del.; and Yonkers, N.Y., are eligible to apply. All schools must contain grade 7. Schools with special education students ages 10-15 may also apply.

One-year grants of $5,000 are available to grantees in all cities except New York City. Grantees from New York City are eligible for two-year, $15,000 grants. Contact: Mary Kelly, PEN; (202)-628-7460; e-mail: mkelly@publiceducation.org.

A pplications are due April 10 for Student Science Enrichment Program grants, sponsored by the Burrough's Wellcome Fund. Grants support after-school projects that provide hands-on scientific activities and exploration for middle and high school students.

Public and private schools, museums, zoos, and other nonprofit organizations in North Carolina are eligible to apply. Three-year grants of up to $60,000 each are available. Contact: BWF, SSRP, PO Box 13901, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; (919) 991-5100; fax: (919) 991- 5160; Web site: www.bwfund.org.

Applications are due April 22 for the 2003 SBC Excelerator technology grants from the SBC Foundation, the philanthropic arm of SBC Communications, an international data, voice, and Internet provider.

Grants support projects that enable the expansion of technology infrastructure and resources among nonprofit organizations. One-year grants ranging from $2,500 to $25,000 are available. The foundation will also consider collaborative grants of up to $50,000. Contact: (800) 591-9663; Web site: www.sbc.com/foundation.

Applicati ons are due April 24 for Centers for Learning and Teaching grants from the National Science Foundation. Grants support the education and professional development of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics educators.

School districts, research laboratories, colleges, state and local education agencies, and businesses involved in collaborative partnerships are eligible to apply. Two to three five-year grants are available. All proposals must be submitted via FastLane at www.fasrlane.nsf.gov/a1/newst an.htm. Contact: NSF, Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230; (703) 292-5111; Web site: www.nsf.gov.

Applications are accepted at any time. Space Education Initiatives provides funding for Internet- based, K-12 space education programs. The four programs sponsored nationwide are Moonlink, NEARlink, Marslink, and Orbital Laboratory. The availability of grant money varies by state. Educators may apply for funding through Space Explorers Inc. Contact: SEI, (800) 965-3763; Web sites: www.space- explorers.com/grantinfo; www.moonlink.com; www.near.space-explorers.com; www.marslink.com; www.orbitallaboratory.com.

App lications are accepted at any time. Ongoing grants from the Chesapeake Bay Trust are available to Maryland schools. Grants support programs and projects that engage students in the preservation of the environment, including the water quality of the bay, wildlife-habitat restoration and protection, and other bay initiatives. One-year grants of $2,000 are available. Contact: CBT, 60 West St., Suite 200A, Annapolis, MD 21401; (410) 974-294; Web site: www.chesapeakebaytrust.org.

A pplications are accepted at any time. The Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination, offers grants of up to $2,000 to K-12 teachers. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Applications should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 264-0286, ext. 374.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

Applications are due March 21 for Cognition and Student Learning Research grants from the U.S Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research that examines basic cognitive science in relation to educational application, with the goal of replicating academic successes and developing new intervention programs that utilize the science of learning.

Educational researchers, K- 20 educational institutions, and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. About 12 three-year grants of $250,000 are available. Contact: Elizabeth Albro, IES, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Rm. 602B, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2148; fax: (202) 219-1402; e-mail: Elizabeth.Albro@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Applicatio ns are due March 21 for Reading Comprehension Research grants from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research to develop assessments and identify weaknesses in comprehension for readers of all ages so those problems can be addressed through instruction.

Educational researchers, K-20 educational institutions and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. About 20 three-year grants ranging from $250,000 to $500,000 are available. Contact: Elizabeth Albro, IES, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Rm. 602B, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2148; fax: (202) 219-1402; e-mail: Elizabeth.Albro@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Applicatio ns are due April 1 for the 21st Century Community Learning Center federal grants administered by the Texas Education Agency. Grants support programs that provide academic and enrichment programs for children including, but not limited to, drug and violence prevention, fitness, music education, counseling, and family-literacy programs.

Grants from $50,000 to $175,000 are available to K-12 school districts, charter schools, and educational service centers in Texas. Contact: Texas Education Agency, Document Control Center, Rm. 6-108, 1701 North Congress Avenue, Austin, TX 78701; (512) 463- 9304; fax: (512) 463-9811; e-mail: dcc@tea.state.tx.us
These grants are also available in other states, but have various deadlines. For information on a particular state visit www.ed.gov/21stcclc.

Applications are due April 18 for Teacher Quality Research grants from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research on teacher quality.
Educational researchers, K-20 educational institutions and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. Between five and 15 four-year grants ranging of approximately $300,000 are available. Contact: Harold Himmelfarb, IES, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2031; fax: (202) 219- 2135; e-mail: harold.himmelfarb@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Applicatio ns are due April 18 for Effective Mathematics Education Research grants from the U.S Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research that seeks to identify interventions in math education that can improve achievement for all students, particularly students in middle school.
Educational researchers, K-20 educational institutions, and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. About 15 two- to four-year grants of $350,000 are available. Contact: Heidi Schweingruber, IES, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Rm. 602-C, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2040; fax: (202) 219-1402; e-mail: Heidi.Schweingruber@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Applicatio ns are due April 25 for Social and Character Development Research grants from the U.S Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research to evaluate interventions designed to promote positive social and character development among elementary school children.
Educational researchers, K-20 educational institutions, and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. About eight two- to four-year grants of $450,000 are available. Contact: Tamara Haegerich, IES, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-1201; fax: (202) 219-1402; e-mail: tamara.haegerich@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Applicatio ns are due April 25 for English Language Acquisition Evaluation grants from the U.S Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Grants support research to implement studies that review alternative instruction options for English proficiency and reading achievement among early-elementary school children.
Educational researchers, K-20 educational institutions, and public and private agencies are eligible to apply. About three five-year grants of $1.3 million are available. Contact: Susan Sanchez, IES, National Center for Education Evaluation, 80 F St., NW, Rm. 208, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 208-7061; fax: (202) 219-1725; e-mail: Susan.Sanchez@ed.gov; Web site: https://ies.asciences.com.

Vol. 22, Issue 26, Pages 38-39

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