Published Online: April 17, 2002
Published in Print: April 17, 2002, as Grants

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A symbol (*) marks available grants that have not appeared in a previous issue of Education Week.

GRANTS AWARDED

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

EARLY-COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL GRANTS

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, a Seattle-based philanthropy that supports advances in health and education, recently awarded more than $40 million to eight organizations to create 70 small high schools across the country. The new "early college" schools will allow students to earn both high school diplomas and two-year college degrees. ("'Early College' High Schools Get Funding Boost," March 27, 2002.)

The recipient organizations and award amounts are:

Antioch University Seattle, Seattle, $3 million, to work with Native American tribal communities in Washington state to create eight early-college schools from six existing and two new schools.

Jobs for the Future, Boston, $5.7 million, to coordinate and manage the grant effort, and to act as a policy advocate for early-college schools.

KnowledgeWorks Foundation, Cincinnati, $2.7 million, to develop a state-level research laboratory to redefine small-school models in Ohio.

Middle College High School Consortium, New York City, $7.6 million, to open five new and 15 redesigned early-college schools on community college campuses.

National Council of LaRaza, Washington, $7.2 million, to create 14 early-college schoolseight new and six redesignedthat will enroll mostly Hispanic students from low-income families.

Secme Inc., Atlanta, $4.8 million, to create eight early- college schools in the Southeast region that are located on or adjacent to historically black universities or Hispanic-serving institutions.

Utah Partnership Foundation, Salt Lake City, $3.5 million, to sponsor the New Century High Schools initiative, which will create six charter schools with a technology focus.

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Program, Princeton, N.J., $5.8 million, to start nine new high schools and one redesigned school, to encourage integration of liberal arts education in high schools and colleges.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

EPIDEMIOLOGY COMPETITION GRANT

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a Princeton, N.J.-based foundation dedicated to supporting health and health care, recently awarded $8.5 million to the College Board, a membership association based in New York City that provides college-entrance services.

The grant will be used to create a national competition for high school students and teachers based on epidemiology, the science of discovering causes of illness and injury through patterns of occurrence.

The Young Epidemiology Scholars program will recognize six teachers annually for teaching and mentoring students in the field. A competition for high school juniors will award college scholarships for original research using the principles of epidemiology.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHER RECRUITING

The U.S. Department of Education recently awarded $600,000 to the Boston Plan for Excellence in the Public Schools Foundation to work in partnership with the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Boston Public Schools to help mid-career professionals make the transition to teaching careers in mathematics and science. The Transition to Teaching Math and Science program will provide a stipend and ongoing support and education while candidates undergo training and internships in the schools.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time for small grants for programs that improve classroom teaching and learning of math, science, and technology for students in grades 7-12, sponsored by the Toshiba America Foundation. Public and private schools, local education agencies, and youth organizations in the United States, Canada, and Mexico may apply. Projects should provide direct benefits to students and include teacher-led, classroom- based experiences. Grants of up to $5,000 are offered monthly throughout the year. Contact: TAF, Program Office, 1251 Avenue of the Americas, 41st Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 588-0820; e-mail: foundation@tai.toshiba.com; Web site: www.toshiba.com/about/taf.html.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

DISABILITIES EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are due May 1 for grants sponsored by the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation. Eligible organizations must be nonprofit and led by or for the support of individuals with disabilities, with an emphasis on women. Programs with both local impact and national or international significance that are meeting needs of disabled individuals in the community will be considered. Grants from $1,000 to $5,000 are available. Contact: Deborah Lewis, Executive Director, ELA Foundation, 2460 N. Lake Ave., PMB #128, Altadena, CA 91001; (626) 398-8840; fax: (626) 398-8843; e-mail: executivedirector@ela.org; Web site: www.ela.org/ada/frame_ada.html.

* EXPERIMENTAL GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION

Applications are due June 3 for grants from the Venture Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support work by nonprofit organizations and educational institutions engaging children in nontraditional, hands-on programs in three areas: understanding cultures through their own heritage and preserving cultural diversity; learning and using geographic concepts and skills; and building the skills to make environmental decisions based on scientific knowledge, a geographic perspective, and a commitment to conservation. Grants from $50,000 to $200,000 are available. Contact: Venture Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/f oundation.

* GEOGRAPHY TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are due June 14 for grants from the Teacher Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support teachers' work in the classroom, district, or community in four areas: exploring uses of new technologies, expanding students' experiential-learning opportunities, providing professional development and mentoring, and engaging families and communities in education. Individual teachers or teacher teams are eligible. Grants from $500 to $5,000 are available. Contact: Teacher Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/f oundation.

* GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are due June 14 for grants from the Grosvenor Grants program, sponsored by the National Geographic Society Education Foundation. Grants support the work of educational institutions and nonprofit organizations in two areas: expanding learning opportunities for teachers and students via experiential learning, professional development, and teacher mentoring; and promoting global geographic literacy via student assessments and innovative teaching and learning practices. Grants from $50,000 to $70,000 are available. Contact: Grosvenor Grants, NGSEF, 1145 17th St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036; Web site: www.nationalgeographic.com/f oundation.

SPACE EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time. Space Education Initiatives provides funding for Internet-based, K-12 space education programs. The four programs sponsored nationwide are Moonlink, NEARlink, Marslink, and Orbital Laboratory. The availability of grant money varies by state. Educators may apply for funding through Space Explorers Inc. Contact: SEI, (800) 965-3763; Web sites: www.space-explorers.com/grantinfo; www.moonlink.com; near.space-explorers.com; www.marslink.com; www.orbitallaboratory.com.

TOLERANCE EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are accepted at any time. The Teaching Tolerance project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit group that fights discrimination, offers grants of up to $2,000 to K-12 teachers. The grants are awarded for activities promoting diversity, peacemaking, community service, or other aspects of tolerance education. Applications should include a typed, 500-word description of the activity and the proposed budget. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding. Contact: Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; (334) 264-0286, ext. 374.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

STATE SPECIAL EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are due April 29 for grants from the Special Education: State Improvement Grants Program, sponsored by the office of special education and rehabilitation services. Grants support efforts by state education agencies to improve the education of individuals with disabilties. About 13 awards of roughly $1 million each are available. Contact: Grants and Contracts Services Team, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 3317, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-2641; (202) 260-9182; TDD phone: (202) 205-8953; fax: (202) 205-8717.

* SCHOOL COUNSELING GRANTS

Applications are due May 13 for grants from the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support the expansion of elementary school counseling programs. About seven awards from $250,000 to $400,000 are available. Contact: Loretta McDaniel, USDE, Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 3E220, Washington, DC 20202-6123; (202) 260-2661; e-mail: loretta.mcdaniel@ed.gov.

* ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION GRANTS

Applications are due May 16 for grants from the Alaska Native Education Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support programs that meet the educational needs of Alaska natives. About 16 awards from $500,000 to $2 million are available. Contact: Lynn Thomas, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., FOB6, Room 3C126, Mail Stop 6140, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 260-1541; e-mail Lynn.thomas@ed.gov.

* DROPOUT PREVENTION GRANTS

Applications are due May 20 for grants from the School Dropout Prevention Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support school dropout-prevention and reentry programs in high schools with annual school dropout rates greater than the annual state average school dropout rate and in the middle schools that feed students into those high schools. About 15 awards from $200,000 to $500,000 are available. Contact: Christine Jackson, USDE, OESE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 2W104, FOB-6, Washington, DC 20202-6254; (202) 260-2516; e- mail: christine.jackson@ed.gov.

* READING FIRST GRANTS

Applications are due May 29 for grants from the Reading First program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support scientifically based reading programs that help all students ready proficiently by 3rd grade. About 57 awards of unspecified amounts are available. Contact: Chris Doherty, Reading First Program Office, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Room 2W108, Washington, DC 20202- 6201; (202) 401-4877; email: ReadingFirst@ed.gov.

* AMERICAN HISTORY TEACHING GRANTS

Applications are due June 3 for grants from the Teaching American History Grant Program, sponsored by the office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support professional- development programs for teachers that increase their knowledge and appreciation of traditional American history. About 200 awards from $350,000 to $1 million are available. Contact: Christine Miller, Teaching American History Grant Program, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave. S.W., Washington, DC 20202-6200; (202) 260-8766; e-mail: teachingamericanhistory@ed.gov.

Vol. 21, Issue 31, Page 41

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