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Published in Print: April 18, 2001, as Inside Bush's Education Budget

Inside Bush's Education Budget

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The president's proposed fiscal 2002 budget for the Department of Education would substantially increase spending for some programs, while freezing, cutting, or eliminating others. Below are highlights from the discretionary- spending totals Mr. Bush is requesting, compared with the current program levels.*





Reading $286 million $900 million +214.7
Special education state grants $6.3 billion $7.3 billion +15.8
Title 1 grants to districts $8.6 billion $9.1 billion +5.3
1Teacher-quality grants to states $2.2 billion $2.6 billion +16.8
Pell Grants $8.8 billion $9.8 billion +11.4
21st Century learning centers $846 million $846 million 0
Safe and drug-free schools $644 million $644 million 0
Bilingual and immigrant ed $460 million $460million 0
School renovation $1.2 billion $0 -100
2Choice and innovative grants $934 million $472 million -49.5
3 Education technology $872 million $817 million -6.3
International education exchange $10 million $0 -100
Vocational education $1.24 billion $1.22 billion -1.6

NOTES: *Percentages calculated using specific budget figures, not rounded numbers shown here.

1 Would merge class-size-reduction, Eisenhower professional development, and parental assistance programs into a flexible fund to improve teacher quality and shrink class sizes.

2 Would merge 10 programs into a new block grant to states. Allowable activities would include school choice and those authorized under the consolidated programs.

3 Would merge nine technology programs into new technology block grant. The 2001 total includes $55 million in one-time earmarks for special projects.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education.

Vol. 20, Issue 31, Page 33

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