Published Online: January 24, 2001
Published in Print: January 24, 2001, as Federal File

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No. 1 for Title I

George W. Bush isn't the only one bringing Texans to Washington this year.

Outgoing Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley this month named Joseph F. Johnson, a former Texas education official, to lead the federal Title I program for disadvantaged students. The position is not a political appointment, and does not require approval by the Senate.

Mr. Johnson, currently the program director for district support and services at the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin, is set to begin work full time as Title I director on March 5.

From 1988 to 1995, Mr. Johnson led a statewide initiative to raise academic standards, improve achievement, and increase accountability in Title I-supported schools. He replaces Mary Jean LeTendre, who is retiring from the department after serving as Title I director for some 15 years.


Filling Goodling's Shoes

Among the new Republican members of the House Education and the Workforce Committee is a lawmaker from Pennsylvania with some big shoes to fill: Rep. Todd R. Platts.

Mr. Platts won the seat vacated by Rep. Bill Goodling, R-Pa., who chaired the committee for the past six years. The House freshman doesn't have his predecessor's experience as a school administrator, but he is no stranger to education, either.

Mr. Platts served on the education committee in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives for eight years; for the past two years, he chaired the subcommittee on basic education.

Another notable among the six new Republicans on the committee is Tom Osborne of Nebraska, who was the head coach of the University of Nebraska football team for 25 years and has a doctorate in educational psychology.

The Democrats had not decided their final lineup for the committee as of last week.

—Erik W. Robelen

Vol. 20, Issue 19, Page 21

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